Honda Clarity Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had to replace one tire a few weeks ago. Three tires had 11,000 miles on them. I have been getting the Tire Low warning every few weeks now. I look at the tires (all look fully inflated. I checked them all the first two times I got the message). Now I just reset the TPMS.
Is this a normal issue? I believe someone on the board said the TPMS measures wheel rotation in relation to each other? If so, then I will live with it. If not, any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Did you reset the system?.

I had similar issues a year ago where the warning would pop up even though tire pressures were fine.
i tried the calibration a few times but it would continue to give the false error.

After a reset of the system the issue went away.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
608 Posts
With colder temps, tire pressures will drop and cause TPMS rotational system to read low pressure.

All my cars have indicated low pressure due to cold temps.

You have to make sure you keep topping off the air and reset the tire pressure system to recalibrate.

I take my cars to America's Tire drive thru air service (free).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
it was suggested to me to deflate your tires a few pounds and then reset the TMPS. Then re-inflate tires so that there is more give in the system before warning goes off.
 

·
Registered
2018 PHEV Touring Atlanta, GA
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
it was suggested to me to deflate your tires a few pounds and then reset the TMPS. Then re-inflate tires so that there is more give in the system before warning goes off.
I know that works with regular TPMS, the type that reads actual air pressure. I'm not sure that it would work with the type of system we have that measures differences in rotational speed between the wheels.

As a hypothetical example, when calibrating TPMS it notices that the LF wheel is rotating 1% faster than the RF wheel. It takes your word for it that all of the tires are at correct pressure, so it assumes that this rotational difference between these two tires is normal (example if one tire is newer than the other). Later while you are driving it notices that the LF tire is now rotating 2% faster than the RF wheel, so it assumes that the LF tire may be going flat and it pops up a warning message. The actual calculations I'm sure are a bit more involved as all four tires are being compared to each other. But either way, equally adjusting all four tires down and then up again shouldn't change the rotational differences between tires, at least as far as I know. Not to say that the method that you are talking about wouldn't work, just seems a little less likely than with regular TPMS.
 

·
Registered
2018 PHEV Touring Atlanta, GA
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Great reminder that you were able to solve your recurring TPMS issue by doing a 12V reset. For those who aren't familiar with what that is, you simply disconnect the 12V negative battery terminal for a minute or so then reconnect it. This clears driving history and also seems to clear out cobwebs from the database as this has been seen to fix a variety of odd problems. It's the equivalent of rebooting your PC. After doing the 12V reset, the first time you start the car there will be several ominous sounding warning messages, but those clear within the first mile.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Moot point now - I just got a nail in the right rear tire about a mile from the house. TPMS did not trigger. I noticed it because I was washing the car when I got home. 4lbs pressure. I will check it visually tomorrow before driving again. I have the tire hazard warranty from Discount Tire. I have an appt. tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
2018 PHEV Touring Atlanta, GA
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
In my case I just did the reset from the console
Oh okay, you are talking about on the infotainment screen going to:

Settings -> System -> Others -> Factory Data Reset.

Good to know that fixed it.

12V reset is still a good thing to try first on odd problems because it seems to leave most if not all user settings intact, it just seems to clear history like recent mpg, most of which is pretty useless anyway. And the guess-o-meter will suddenly be way up or down from what it was before as it no longer has recent driving history. But after just a few trips it soon settles back to its old inaccurate self.
 

·
Registered
2018, Honda, Clarity PHEV Touring
Joined
·
203 Posts
There is an infotainment button to "calibrate" the TPMS.

Adjust/Check the pressures, select calibrate, then drive around.

What I suspect is you had the nail for a while and were just recalibrating while it was trying to warn you about the nail....

I started lowering pressure from the Honda recommended 36 PSI. At some point I dropped all four down to somewhere around 31 PSI. I recalibrated and drove around. All of a sudden on the start of a 270 degree turnout from the freeway, (10 E to Baldwin Ave), I get a TPMS warning. I go home and check and all four tire pressure and nothing unusual. The next morning I check and they are all the same down to 0.5 PSI. I recalibrated again. No more aberrant warnings. Somehow the system can track GPS data to catch an all four low situation I suspect....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
it was suggested to me to deflate your tires a few pounds and then reset the TMPS. Then re-inflate tires so that there is more give in the system before warning goes off.
This won't work on any modern TPMS system. Those that monitor the actual air pressure will continue reporting low when the pressure drops below the preset threshold. The Clarity's system might work this way if you recalibrate before inflating again, but why would you want to do this for a road car as you seriously raise the risk for tire blowout before the Clarity's TPMS realizes a tire is low.

A tire's load limit is calculated at the Max cold PSI printed on the sidewall. The load limit drops as the tire's pressure is lowered, which is why you see "low" weight capacity on many cars. The manufacturer has lowered the tire pressure for comfort and then must adjust the vehicle max weight accordingly. This came to light when the Ford Explorers were rolling over and Ford blamed Firestone for faulty tires. Firestone looked at the recommended PSI published by Ford and announced that running their tires at Ford's recommended PSI would overload the vehicle with four adults in it, even without cargo.
 

·
Registered
2018, Honda, Clarity PHEV Touring
Joined
·
203 Posts
I have wondered about that possibility but don't know if any car makers are doing this yet.
Last night I got a low pressures warning chime, light, and message on the instrument cluster. Checked the pressures this morning with my Slime digital gauge, (0.5 PSI increments), and they are all 31.0 PSI, exactly the same. (I last set them all at 30.5 PSI maybe two weeks ago after which I started the calibration and drove around (a little bit that morning). I had gotten an alignment in the last month or month and a half and adjusted the pressures the next morning and calibrated....
 

·
Registered
2018 PHEV Touring Atlanta, GA
Joined
·
1,080 Posts
Last night I got a low pressures warning chime, light, and message on the instrument cluster. Checked the pressures this morning with my Slime digital gauge, (0.5 PSI increments), and they are all 31.0 PSI, exactly the same. (I last set them all at 30.5 PSI maybe two weeks ago after which I started the calibration and drove around (a little bit that morning). I had gotten an alignment in the last month or month and a half and adjusted the pressures the next morning and calibrated....
If you know the pressures are good and you don't run calibration, will the message eventually go away after a few trips, or does it seem to be stuck on the message until you run calibration again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
If you know the pressures are good and you don't run calibration, will the message eventually go away after a few trips, or does it seem to be stuck on the message until you run calibration again?
My understanding is you have to calibrate to get the message to go away. Since calibration is drop dead simple there's no reason not to do so. I also calibrate anytime I check the tires and have to inflate one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 2002

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
I started lowering pressure from the Honda recommended 36 PSI. At some point I dropped all four down to somewhere around 31 PSI.
By doing this you're putting yourself at an elevated risk of tire blowout. The load limit for a tire assumes running at the max sidewall PSI and drops rapidly as you lower the tire pressure.
 

·
Registered
2018, Honda, Clarity PHEV Touring
Joined
·
203 Posts
@obermd Thank you for the warning. I've been driving around like this for at least a few thousand miles and I can say touching the tires after driving last night I notice no signs of overheating, maybe slightly warm to the touch: driver 175 lbs, two passengers (220 lbs total I guess), and maybe 75 lbs of luggage. What I have gained is somewhat even treadwear progression. The centers of the tires are still worn maybe 1 - 2 mm more than the edges...

(I'll try to scan them with an Autel MaxiTPMS TBE200 and see if I can post the readings.)

I don't wait long enough for a few trips to observe whether it goes away or not. (This time I got two trips in, one from the gas station to home. The second when I started her after verifying pressures this morning). Each time the warning instantly showed up. I then proceeded to calibrate (this morning) and the warning immediately clears.
 

·
Registered
2020 Clarity Touring
Joined
·
359 Posts
@obermd Thank you for the warning. I've been driving around like this for at least a few thousand miles and I can say touching the tires after driving last night I notice no signs of overheating, maybe slightly warm to the touch: driver 175 lbs, two passengers (220 lbs total I guess), and maybe 75 lbs of luggage. What I have gained is somewhat even treadwear progression. The centers of the tires are still worn maybe 1 - 2 mm more than the edges...

(I'll try to scan them with an Autel MaxiTPMS TBE200 and see if I can post the readings.)

I don't wait long enough for a few trips to observe whether it goes away or not. (This time I got two trips in, one from the gas station to home. The second when I started her after verifying pressures this morning). Each time the warning instantly showed up. I then proceeded to calibrate (this morning) and the warning immediately clears.
From what I can tell the TPMS warning will not clear unless you do a calibration. The system is a weak point for the Clarity as far as I’m concerned. I’ve had the warning come on 3-4 times in the last 18 months and each time the tire pressures were fine. I think Honda made a mistake in not using the common method with pressure sensors in each wheel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
632 Posts
@obermd Thank you for the warning. I've been driving around like this for at least a few thousand miles and I can say touching the tires after driving last night I notice no signs of overheating, maybe slightly warm to the touch: driver 175 lbs, two passengers (220 lbs total I guess), and maybe 75 lbs of luggage. What I have gained is somewhat even treadwear progression. The centers of the tires are still worn maybe 1 - 2 mm more than the edges...

(I'll try to scan them with an Autel MaxiTPMS TBE200 and see if I can post the readings.)

I don't wait long enough for a few trips to observe whether it goes away or not. (This time I got two trips in, one from the gas station to home. The second when I started her after verifying pressures this morning). Each time the warning instantly showed up. I then proceeded to calibrate (this morning) and the warning immediately clears.
Tires wear differently if they're on the front vs. rear. Front tires tend to wear more on the edges as a result of turning while rear tires tend to wear more in the center. This is why front to back rotation is important.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top