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We lost my wife's Prius Prime last May (totaled in an accident: it needed $20K+ to repair; I needed a band-aid). We found an '18 Touring with 15K miles for $28.5K (a bit much, I thought, but in this crazy car market, that constitutes a good deal). My question: will the Prime's Level 1 charger work on our Clarity?
 

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2018 PHEV Touring Atlanta, GA
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We lost my wife's Prius Prime last May (totaled in an accident: it needed $20K+ to repair; I needed a band-aid). We found an '18 Touring with 15K miles for $28.5K (a bit much, I thought, but in this crazy car market, that constitutes a good deal). My question: will the Prime's Level 1 charger work on our Clarity?
Yes it will work, both the Prius Prime and the Clarity use J1772 which is the standard level 1 EVSE for all plug-in vehicles except for Tesla.

Did they give you a level 1 charger with the car?
 

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A J1772 is compatible; the car itself controls the charging rates and voltage levels it wants. And, if you charged your Prime at any commercial place like a checkpoint, you'll be good to go. I agree $28K is a bit on the high side, but the mileage is low. Mine was a 2018 Touring, at $18K, but at 50K miles it was in such good shape that I thought it was worth it. I have not been disappointed with the purchase, although, sadly, it's now an orphaned car as Honda is doing something else with their future plug-in electrics.
 

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2021 PHEV Touring HB, CA
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A J1772 is compatible; the car itself controls the charging rates and voltage levels it wants. And, if you charged your Prime at any commercial place like a checkpoint, you'll be good to go. I agree $28K is a bit on the high side, but the mileage is low. Mine was a 2018 Touring, at $18K, but at 50K miles it was in such good shape that I thought it was worth it. I have not been disappointed with the purchase, although, sadly, it's now an orphaned car as Honda is doing something else with their future plug-in electrics.
Point of clarification: The vehicle can't control the voltage level that the EVSE supplies. That's set by the electrical circuit the EVSE is plugged into. An EVSE is really just a smart relay, located between the wall circuit and the charger circuits located in the vehicle itself.

The EVSE advertises what current it's capable of via the Pilot signal. The vehicle's on-board charger can draw current up to that limit. Some vehicles can draw different levels of current (usually using Level 1), dependent on driver's settings within the vehicle. For example, the Chevy Bolt can draw either 8A or 12A from a Level 1 EVSE capable of at least 12A.
 

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the Chevy Bolt can draw either 8A or 12A from a Level 1 EVSE capable of at least 12A.
Is that for situations like plugging in at a friend or relative's house and you aren't sure what else may be on the circuit?
 

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Will a Tesla to J1772 adapter allow me to do a level 2 charge from a Tesla charger and include all of the monitoring available on a 1772 chare station?
 

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Is that for situations like plugging in at a friend or relative's house and you aren't sure what else may be on the circuit?
Exactly. The 12A setting can allow one to use the EVSE on a 15A dedicated circuit, while still meeting the NEC 80% guideline. It defaults to 8A, and setting it to 12A only lasts for 90 days, IIRC. 15A circuits are far more common than 20A, at least in the US.

I also have a 16A Level 1 EVSE that I use on a 20A garage circuit, but only because I know it's the only thing on the circuit, also meeting the NEC 80% guideline. Like the Clarity and Bolt's OEM EVSE, it can be used on a 240V circuit as well. The way I wired my garage, I've got two duplex receptacles at each outlet location, each on a different 20A 240V phase, so I can combine them with an adapter to get 240V at 20A, should I desire.

After 20 years of owning EVs, I have a pretty eclectic collection of EVSEs and multiple adapters.
 

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The 12A setting can allow one to use the EVSE on a 15A dedicated circuit, while still meeting the NEC 80% guideline. It defaults to 8A, and setting it to 12A only lasts for 90 days, IIRC.
Probably safer to default to 8A since I would guess that the 15A outlets in most garages and carports are not on a dedicated circuit. Mine isn't, my garage outlet is on the same circuit as the outlets in the basement, and even the outdoor outlets! But I do almost all of my charging late at night because of my time of use plan, so I would never use the outdoor outlets or outlets in the basement while charging. The one exception is I have a dehumidifier in the basement which runs during the summer, but I have that on a timer so that the dehumidifier doesn't run during my scheduled charging times.

Honda took something of a chance by providing a fixed 12A EVSE, but I guess they feel they are covered since they state in the owners manual that you should only use it on a dedicated circuit. So if someone uses it on a non-dedicated circuit and things go wrong, it's on them. Chevy's approach seems best, default to the safer 8A, but an owner who knows what they are doing can increase it to 12A. Of course that doesn't stop owners who don't know what they are doing from setting it to 12A when they shouldn't, but there's only so much you can do to protect people from themselves.

I've got two duplex receptacles at each outlet location, each on a different 20A 240V phase, so I can combine them with an adapter to get 240V at 20A, should I desire.
Was there an advantage to doing it that way instead of installing separate 120V and 240V outlets?
 

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Probably safer to default to 8A since I would guess that the 15A outlets in most garages and carports are not on a dedicated circuit. Mine isn't, my garage outlet is on the same circuit as the outlets in the basement, and even the outdoor outlets! But I do almost all of my charging late at night because of my time of use plan, so I would never use the outdoor outlets or outlets in the basement while charging. The one exception is I have a dehumidifier in the basement which runs during the summer, but I have that on a timer so that the dehumidifier doesn't run during my scheduled charging times.

Honda took something of a chance by providing a fixed 12A EVSE, but I guess they feel they are covered since they state in the owners manual that you should only use it on a dedicated circuit. So if someone uses it on a non-dedicated circuit and things go wrong, it's on them. Chevy's approach seems best, default to the safer 8A, but an owner who knows what they are doing can increase it to 12A. Of course that doesn't stop owners who don't know what they are doing from setting it to 12A when they shouldn't, but there's only so much you can do to protect people from themselves.


Was there an advantage to doing it that way instead of installing separate 120V and 240V outlets?
I do have both on one side of the garage, at the big door. I've got a 240V 14-50R at that location, with a 30A Level 2 EVSE plugged in to it. I use that occasionally when I need a quicker charge than other options can provide. I like the ability to charge at the lowest rate necessary to fill up whatever's in the driveway by the time I need it. Also, I don't like regularly plugging and unplugging the 14-50, because they really don't have the duty cycle capability to support it.

The other side has a 14-50R mid-garage to serve any garaged EVs, as well as the dual duplex 5-20Rs described above, out near the large door. We've got several friends and relatives with EVs, and I wanted to be able to accommodate them for parties. We can charge four EVs/PHEVs at the same time: One in the garage, and three in the driveway, but they all won't get 30A Level 2.

It helped greatly that I did all the garage wiring as part of a to-the-studs house remodel. I did it myself, under the supervision of a licensed electrician, who was putting in a new 200A panel, and completely rewiring (in #12AWG!) and re-fixturing the rest of the house.

As an aside, the decision to do the rewiring of the house was due to what we found when we went to pigtail all of the fixtures, because of the original wiring being aluminum. (The house was built in 1968-9.) I wouldn't have been able to get a good night's sleep in the place, knowing what we found hadn't absolutely been corrected.
 
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