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What leads you to believe that our J1772 EVSE (not "chargers") are becoming outdated?

They are a robust, international standard.
The j1772 is prevalent throughout my state for sure but the new places being built with chargers I e Walmart/Costco/samsclub charging stations are all ccs or chadmo. I feel they’re going to over time phase us out.
 

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The J1772 chargers we use are quickly becoming outdated. does anyone know if our charge ports can be upgraded?
J1772 is the SAE standard for Level 1 and Level 2 Alternating Current chargers. It's an international standard and these EVSEs aren't going anywhere. Where are you seeing they're becoming outdated?
 
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The j1772 is prevalent throughout my state for sure but the new places being built with chargers I e Walmart/Costco/samsclub charging stations are all ccs or chadmo. I feel they’re going to over time phase us out.
Chadmo is a dying standard. Only Nissan used it and even they're abandoning it now in favor of J1772 and CCS. CCS is a higher speed, direct current fast charging (DCFC) standard that supports up to 400 KW per hour charging. This is the standard being installed in a lot of places in the US now, but there's almost always a J1772 plug or two available at these locations.
 
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The j1772 is prevalent throughout my state for sure but the new places being built with chargers I e Walmart/Costco/samsclub charging stations are all ccs or chadmo. I feel they’re going to over time phase us out.
J1772 is the AC standard for L1 and L2, and will continue for the foreseeable future.

CCS and CHAdeMO are for Direct Current Fast Charging. (DCFS), which are different high power EV charging standards. CCS is shared with the port hardware for the J1772 on many (most?) EVs, which is why you'll usually see it called "Combo". Leafs have J1772 and CHAdeMO on entirely different charging ports, for L1/L2 and DCFC, respectively. CHAdeMO appears to be on the way out, as only one major EV manufacturer still supports it (Nissan).

L1/L2 are not being "replaced" by CCS. They serve very different purposes.

L1/L2 are usually found at residences or destinations that people usually spend hours at. Think hotels and restaurants. I can recharge at home during the interval I'm there between work days, too.

CCS and other DCFC standards (like Tesla Superchargers) are more often used by drivers that are putting many hundreds of miles a day on their vehicles, but don't have many hours to wait for a recharge. Think road trips of many hundreds of miles, or rideshare providers.
 

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The j1772 is prevalent throughout my state for sure but the new places being built with chargers I e Walmart/Costco/samsclub charging stations are all ccs or chadmo. I feel they’re going to over time phase us out.
Yes there is another forum I’m on that owners noticed this happening around NYC. I am also noticing the newest ones have 0 J-1772 chargers here in Southern CA.

This charger in the center of PlugShare screenshot shows a newly built station. It wasn’t even on PlugShare for a while but I can confirm I checked them mostly CCS and CHAdeMo but 0 J-1772.
 

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I have a mobile charger but I’m talking about them phasing us out over time. Getting one right now isn’t the problem
I wouldn’t worry about it much. Even in the worst case scenario where everyone stops making any EVSE with a J1772 plug tomorrow, some enterprising individual will come up with an adapter plug that will allow us to charge J1772 with whatever other competing format is out there.
 

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My new 2022 Ford Lightning EV truck will be delivered next month and it has both J1772 for Level 1 and 2 charging as well as CCS for DC Fast Charge.

What's nice about J1772 is that it is the SAE standard.

My home charger is a J1772 and we will share between the Honda Clarity PHEV and the incoming Lightning EV truck:
Peripheral Output device Audio equipment Font Gas
 

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The J1772 chargers we use are quickly becoming outdated. does anyone know if our charge ports can be upgraded?
The j1772 is prevalent throughout my state for sure but the new places being built with chargers I e Walmart/Costco/samsclub charging stations are all ccs or chadmo. I feel they’re going to over time phase us out.
It's no real surprise that there are more DC chargers being installed because that's what people want when they are on the road, the fastest charge possible. That's because they are driving EV's which rely solely on electricity to get to their destination (or to make it back home). Whereas a PHEV is designed so that EV driving is mainly for around town, then for longer trips you can quickly fill up on gasoline which is readily available pretty much anywhere, instead of hunting down sometimes elusive charging stations where you then have to spend time charging. That will eventually change, but that's pretty much the way it is currently in most parts of the country.

The only charging that I do outside of home is at a store that I go to maybe once a month that has a free Volta charging station. If at some point they switch it to DC only, then oh well I won't be able to charge there anymore. But that won't stop me from getting to where I need to go.
 

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Yes there is another forum I’m on that owners noticed this happening around NYC. I am also noticing the newest ones have 0 J-1772 chargers here in Southern CA.

This charger in the center of PlugShare screenshot shows a newly built station. It wasn’t even on PlugShare for a while but I can confirm I checked them mostly CCS and CHAdeMo but 0 J-1772.
J1772 are practically worthless when on the road. To fill a 70kWh battery (for example) would take over three hours at the fastest rate available on a J1772 L2. (L2 maxes out at 80A and 240V, which is 19.2kW.)

The reason you're not seeing them at the roadside is that they are impractical. DCFC is the practical, much faster, method for EV charging at roadside.

As a standard, J1772 isn't going anywhere anytime soon, no matter how much misinterpreted anecdotal evidence is offered.
 

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It's no real surprise that there are more DC chargers being installed because that's what people want when they are on the road, the fastest charge possible. That's because they are driving EV's which rely solely on electricity to get to their destination (or to make it back home). Whereas a PHEV is designed so that EV driving is mainly for around town, then for longer trips you can quickly fill up on gasoline which is readily available pretty much anywhere, instead of hunting down sometimes elusive charging stations where you then have to spend time charging. That will eventually change, but that's pretty much the way it is currently in most parts of the country.

The only charging that I do outside of home is at a store that I go to maybe once a month that has a free Volta charging station. If at some point they switch it to DC only, then oh well I won't be able to charge there anymore. But that won't stop me from getting to where I need to go.
Yes, agreed when I look for long distance drives, DCFC are very common.

But when I sleep overnight at a hotel I select one that has a L2 charger as I have lots more time to recharge both driver and vehicle.
 

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J1772 are practically worthless when on the road. To fill a 70kWh battery (for example) would take over three hours at the fastest rate available on a J1772 L2. (L2 maxes out at 80A and 240V, which is 19.2kW.)

The reason you're not seeing them at the roadside is that they are impractical. DCFC is the practical, much faster, method for EV charging at roadside.

As a standard, J1772 isn't going anywhere anytime soon, no matter how much misinterpreted anecdotal evidence is offered.
It was an observation of newly built stations. I would have been happy to charge there while I shopped at Walmart, not quite next to an arterial freeway but it is next to a road I'll give you that.

To say that they are impractical for BEVs and hence not being added is the same thing as admitting they aren't in fact being added, which was the concern of the thread....
 

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My new 2022 Ford Lightning EV truck will be delivered next month and it has both J1772 for Level 1 and 2 charging as well as CCS for DC Fast Charge.

What's nice about J1772 is that it is the SAE standard.

My home charger is a J1772 and we will share between the Honda Clarity PHEV and the incoming Lightning EV truck:
View attachment 1028
I remember when we bought our Leviton 40A back in 2013 it was around $1k. Pricing definitely has improved. There is now at least one offering for DC at home, albeit pricey!

 

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But when I sleep overnight at a hotel I select one that has a L2 charger as I have lots more time to recharge both driver and vehicle.
To me that's the opposite of why I got a PHEV, which is so that I don't have to deal with charging on trips. If I had an EV I suppose it would be a consideration, but since I have a PHEV my hotel selection is based solely on location, price, and quality.

Also the charging station may not be in a convenient location in relation to your room, which can add time to unloading and loading your car. And there is the possibility that all of the chargers are in use and you can't use them anyway.

All of this effort just to save what is the equivalent of about one gallon of gasoline. To me it's just not worth it. When I am on a trip my priorities are time and convenience, I don't want to spend any amount of extra time dealing with charging. HV Charge can handle my needs for keeping some EV miles available. But sure if the hotel I am already staying at has an available charger and it's convenient to use then I would use it. But that would be the exception on a trip.

Some people even charge at hotels that don't have charge stations, getting permission to use an outdoor outlet. But that requires bringing your EVSE with you on the trip. Many people including myself have our EVSE mounted on the wall so it requires removing it. Now of course some people use level 2 at home and have their old level 1 EVSE available, but still it takes up room in the trunk which might be already filling up with luggage. Yes there's the little storage compartment in the trunk but I already have stuff in there.

Then when you get to the hotel you have to spend a few minutes looking for an outlet. Which likely requires parking in a spot not as close to your room. And in some cases it might require a bit of traipsing through some shrubbery to get to the outlet. And then the cable will likely be draped across a sidewalk creating a trip hazard for other people.

I know there can be some fun in maximizing our EV usage, and when in that mind frame the inconveniences that I am describing I suppose just add to the challenge. But for me, when I am on a trip I have no interest in any of that.

I would have been happy to charge there while I shopped at Walmart, not quite next to an arterial freeway but it is next to a road I'll give you that.
If you were already shopping there and it's free I can see that. But on a trip it would not be worth driving out of the way to get to a Walmart with a charger, especially if you have to pay for using it. And there's the chance it is already taken. I know the apps show you if a charger is available, but that doesn't mean someone can't beat you to it.
 

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To me that's the opposite of why I got a PHEV, which is so that I don't have to deal with charging on trips. If I had an EV I suppose it would be a consideration, but since I have a PHEV my hotel selection is based solely on location, price, and quality.

Also the charging station may not be in a convenient location in relation to your room, which can add time to unloading and loading your car. And there is the possibility that all of the chargers are in use and you can't use them anyway.

All of this effort just to save what is the equivalent of about one gallon of gasoline. To me it's just not worth it. When I am on a trip my priorities are time and convenience, I don't want to spend any amount of extra time dealing with charging. HV Charge can handle my needs for keeping some EV miles available. But sure if the hotel I am already staying at has an available charger and it's convenient to use then I would use it. But that would be the exception on a trip.

Some people even charge at hotels that don't have charge stations, getting permission to use an outdoor outlet. But that requires bringing your EVSE with you on the trip. Many people including myself have our EVSE mounted on the wall so it requires removing it. Now of course some people use level 2 at home and have their old level 1 EVSE available, but still it takes up room in the trunk which might be already filling up with luggage. Yes there's the little storage compartment in the trunk but I already have stuff in there.

Then when you get to the hotel you have to spend a few minutes looking for an outlet. Which likely requires parking in a spot not as close to your room. And in some cases it might require a bit of traipsing through some shrubbery to get to the outlet. And then the cable will likely be draped across a sidewalk creating a trip hazard for other people.

I know there can be some fun in maximizing our EV usage, and when in that mind frame the inconveniences that I am describing I suppose just add to the challenge. But for me, when I am on a trip I have no interest in any of that.


If you were already shopping there and it's free I can see that. But on a trip it would not be worth driving out of the way to get to a Walmart with a charger, especially if you have to pay for using it. And there's the chance it is already taken. I know the apps show you if a charger is available, but that doesn't mean someone can't beat you to it.
Spot on. The troubles with charging while on the road are not worth the 40 extra miles you might achieve. On some longer trips though, I do wish my Clarity had a larger gas tank.
 

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Spot on. The troubles with charging while on the road are not worth the 40 extra miles you might achieve. On some longer trips though, I do wish my Clarity had a larger gas tank.
One of many reasons PHEVs are being phased out and are not in any companies long term plans.

The concept of having both a big battery for decent range for full electric driving, but also having a complete ICE drivetrain with a large gas tank are in fact mutually exclusive. They require compromises to both systems to fit them into a vehicle. While you do have the advantages of both technologies (at least to some extent), you also have the disadvantages and compromises that impact the usefulness of both drivetrains.

PHEVs with their relatively small batteries will never be able to utilize fast charging - having to plug in for hours to get 40ish miles of highway range (vs 200 miles in 15-20 minutes for the newest EVs) means relying on gas for road trips.
 

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One of many reasons PHEVs are being phased out and are not in any companies long term plans.

The concept of having both a big battery for decent range for full electric driving, but also having a complete ICE drivetrain with a large gas tank are in fact mutually exclusive. They require compromises to both systems to fit them into a vehicle. While you do have the advantages of both technologies (at least to some extent), you also have the disadvantages and compromises that impact the usefulness of both drivetrains.

PHEVs with their relatively small batteries will never be able to utilize fast charging - having to plug in for hours to get 40ish miles of highway range (vs 200 miles in 15-20 minutes for the newest EVs) means relying on gas for road trips.
It's too bad that PHEV's are not being given a chance because they have the potential to convert many millions of annual gasoline miles into electric during the transition to full EV which is going to take many years. While EV is certain making rapid progress, currently around 95% of new car buyers will not be purchasing an EV as their next car for many reasons. Although we are seeing dramatic shifts toward EV and that will likely continue, projections that I have seen of when most cars will be fully EV are that it is at least a decade away.

In the meantime most people who are currently shying away from buying an EV for whatever reason, valid or invalid, and will be purchasing a gasoline car as their next vehicle, would likely be able to convert more than half of their driving into electric if they purchase a PHEV instead of a regular gasoline car or hybrid. Even with a smaller battery that provides only 25 EV miles, for many people that is at least 125 miles per week that they would be driving electric. Compared to 0 electric miles if they purchase a regular gasoline car or hybrid which is what they will otherwise do. And for most owners there would be little to no inconvenience owning a PHEV, as they can plug into their regular wall outlet and get a full charge in around six hours. No need to install a 240V outlet. And of course follow their usual routine of using gas stations when making an occasional trip. The beauty of it is the simplicity of the message, plug in your car when convenient, when you can't or if it's not convenient, you can use gas. For a large percentage of the buying public that's a concept they would be willing to embrace if they are not willing to go full EV just yet.
 
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