Honda Clarity Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Maine State inspection sticker runs out today, and the service minder last week said "A1" needed at 22K, so in to the dealer for a service and free state inspection. (My normal mechanic closed shop with all people quarantined for Covid.)
We drive primarily to and from town (36-45 miles, electric usually is sufficient), but half the roads are country (crowned in center). Tires rotated twice. Alignment will happen with new tires. But after reading all the "tire replacement" threads here I learned a lot, but now to make a decision.
We have a CR-V on which I run snows in winter because it has all-wheel drive. Thus All-seasons are on the Clarity all year.
Dealer said tread wear on front tires are 4/32 left and 5/ right; rear left 3/, right 2/ but also said that one tire has damage on inner sidewall and the other has inside wear - can't pass the inspection. So, minimum are two new tires, if not four. (Potholes are something hardly mentioned on this forum LOL) {Which brings up a topic about road taxes, governors who don't like spending money on roads and who want a special tax on plug-in cars. But I digress.}
We don't really need RTFs as we: have good road insurance; tend to drive conservatively, and too old to make trips longer than 100 miles (sitting for more than 50 at a time is a pain anyway) generally all within civilization; not to mention the extra $60 per RTF tire.
Dealer recommends Goodyear Assurance Comfortdrives ($188-UTQG 700AA), which I would probably get IF I get four tires now, or Goodyear Eagle LS-2 ($139-UTQG400AA), if I just want to replace the two worn tires and wear out the two OEMs.
Using you all as devil's advocates, I've got arguments on both sides. Being frugal, I hate to throw away two tires with half? their tread life, but then I'll probably not have worn out the Eagles when the Michelin OEMs are worn out. Of course some of you put a spare in the trunk, so at least one of the OEMs could be used. Hmm.
So, I'd be interested in your thoughts. Thank you very much. G-
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
557 Posts
Yes, the factory tires are not very good in terms of longevity.
For being LRR and Eco, it's understandable.
I have had to replace 2 so far.

Definitely need to get yours to an alignment shop as you have camber/caster issues...

You should replace 2 tires at a time as a minimum with the same exact brand & model tire to match the other 2.
If you can't, then do all 4 tires with the same - winter tires with high silica will be very good all year around for a FWD car.

I am closing in at 40,000 miles and going to the RFT to avoid having to carry a spare or mobility kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, the factory tires are not very good in terms of longevity.
For being LRR and Eco, it's understandable.
I have had to replace 2 so far.

Definitely need to get yours to an alignment shop as you have camber/caster issues...

You should replace 2 tires at a time as a minimum with the same exact brand & model tire to match the other 2.
If you can't, then do all 4 tires with the same - winter tires with high silica will be very good all year around for a FWD car.

I am closing in at 40,000 miles and going to the RFT to avoid having to carry a spare or mobility kit.
Thanks 4sallypat, for your quick reply. I hadn't thought that the two bad tires should be replaced "with the same exact brand & model tire to match the other 2". That precludes just replacing two as the OEMs are not available at this time.

One reason I swap my aggressive studded snows and all weathers on the CR-V is the road noise. I have a 1999 CR-V and the snows really are loud. Also, it is illegal to use them here from May 1st to October 1st, but I don't put them on until the first big storm - not yet this year.

Yes, alignment is a yearly issue here normally, but the first service on the car was at the dealer. They did not do an alignment when they rotated the tires, I believe that was around 10K, and I was incapacitated at the time so never gave it a thought. While there was damage to two tires, the tread wear was even rather than worn on one edge.

We know when one tire got damaged, as my wife was driving and an oncoming car forced her onto the shoulder. She handled it well, but the drop off the edge of the pavement was about 5" - country road - then back up onto the pavement.

Thanks for your advice. G-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
579 Posts
You're in Maine. Get dedicated snow tires for the winter and then switch to a high quality LRR tire in the spring, storing your snow tires. This will give you the traction you'll need for the winter and then get you good tires for mud through leaf seasons.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
557 Posts
When I used to go skiing 6 months out of the year (younger life), I would get a set of winter tires put on all year (not studded) which had enormous grip without having to put on chains in the mountains.

The high silica content winter tires were amazing in the dry pavement as well because it gripped so well albeit a larger loss of tread life due to hot/dry pavement use.

Never switched from winter to summer tires during that time....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I just replaced the OEM tires with 4 Goodyear Assurance Weather Ready tires at 26k. The snow is going to fly here this weekend, so I'll know soon how good they are. They are certainly quieter than the OEM tires.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top