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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been looking to get a second car for the family and test drove a Tesla Model Y this weekend.
Regenerative breaking was very strong on the Tesla, I was surprised.
As soon as I let the pedal go it started breaking really hard, perhaps (subjectively) twice as hard as the maximum
regen setting on the Clarity. It does not let you coast if you take the foot off the gas pedal (pun intended, ICE is entrenched deep in the language).
I thought I looked like a teenager learning to drive their first car. And I thought about
how many kids start throwing up in Teslas until their parents get the hang of driving them.
I am sure one gets used to it pretty fast.

After googling the issue, I found out that Tesla had an option to set the level of regen breaking but it removed it last year.
It is all or nothing now. However, I would still buy a Tesla.

All this to say that I love that little left handle under the steering wheel that controls the level of regen breaking on the Clarity.
 

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The Clarity's regenerative braking is extremely weak. The heavy regen in Tesla's is one of the reasons Tesla isn't on my list of EVs to purchase.
 

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Vehicles like the Clarity have "blended brakes" where regen is activated by the brake pedal, then friction brakes are added in if demand warrants. The transition from pure regen to adding friction brakes into the mix is very tricky to get right. Hondas implementation is among the best (as in "not noticable"). I've driven many vehicles where that is not the case.
Tesla (and some other BEV makers) do the opposite. Completely releasing the accelerator pedal give you the full amount of regen available, and then add in friction brakes at slow speeds to bring you to a stop. It does take some getting used to but feathering the throttle inly to control speed has it's advantages.

Many BEVs have the option of selecting regen level - some by paddles. Some do not.
 

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I love, Love, LOVE the single-pedal driving mode ("L") in the Chevy Bolt.

Have the shifter in "D", and Bolts behave similarly to an ICE, but in "L", regen is quite aggressive, and will slow the Bolt to a stop. Also pull on the left steering wheel paddle, and regen is amazingly aggressive. I play a "game" when driving around town, and try to time my paddle pull to stop the Bolt at the limit line. It's pretty easy to never need to hit the brake pedal when in "L". I do press the brake when stopped, though, just to give the drivers behind me a heads up that traffic is stopping/stopped.

The GM engineers were wizards when they designed the "L"/paddle/regen/brake blending system in the Bolt. It's absolutely seamless. If you have a chance, drive a Bolt for a while. You'll be amazed at how it can be done.
 

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I love, Love, LOVE the single-pedal driving mode ("L") in the Chevy Bolt.

Have the shifter in "D", and Bolts behave similarly to an ICE, but in "L", regen is quite aggressive, and will slow the Bolt to a stop. Also pull on the left steering wheel paddle, and regen is amazingly aggressive. I play a "game" when driving around town, and try to time my paddle pull to stop the Bolt at the limit line. It's pretty easy to never need to hit the brake pedal when in "L". I do press the brake when stopped, though, just to give the drivers behind me a heads up that traffic is stopping/stopped.

The GM engineers were wizards when they designed the "L"/paddle/regen/brake blending system in the Bolt. It's absolutely seamless. If you have a chance, drive a Bolt for a while. You'll be amazed at how it can be done.
GM cheated in the one-pedal stop. Below about 5 KPH the Bolt reverses one of it's engines to complete the stop. This consumes battery power. Engaging the friction brakes would actually be more efficient in this scenario as well as ensure the friction brakes of the one-pedal drivers don't rust and seize from disuse.
 

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GM cheated in the one-pedal stop. Below about 5 KPH the Bolt reverses one of it's engines to complete the stop. This consumes battery power. Engaging the friction brakes would actually be more efficient in this scenario as well as ensure the friction brakes of the one-pedal drivers don't rust and seize from disuse.
Source for this?

Also, the Bolt has one electric motor. (The term "engine" is most commonly used for ICEs.) There are more than 170,000 Bolts on the road, and I've never heard of a single case of Bolt brake disks "rusting and seizing".
 

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Source for this?

Also, the Bolt has one electric motor. (The term "engine" is most commonly used for ICEs.) There are more than 170,000 Bolts on the road, and I've never heard of a single case of Bolt brake disks "rusting and seizing".
Even with one electric motor, to fully stop a vehicle you have to run that motor in reverse at low speed. There simply isn't enough motor torque to bring the vehicle to a complete stop without spinning it backwards, which uses power.
 

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GM cheated in the one-pedal stop. Below about 5 KPH the Bolt reverses one of it's engines to complete the stop. This consumes battery power. Engaging the friction brakes would actually be more efficient in this scenario as well as ensure the friction brakes of the one-pedal drivers don't rust and seize from disuse.
Yeah. If you only engage friction brakes below around 5 kph or even 5 mph your brake pads and rotors will last forever. My 2018 Chrysler Pacific PHEV has about 32,000 miles on it now and the brake pads and rotors look like they’re practically new.
 

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Yeah. If you only engage friction brakes below around 5 kph or even 5 mph your brake pads and rotors will last forever. My 2018 Chrysler Pacific PHEV has about 32,000 miles on it now and the brake pads and rotors look like they’re practically new.
I've put a couple hundred thousand miles on at least a half-dozen different EVs since 1997. I've never replaced a single friction braking system component on any of them. When I had my 2011 Volt (PHEV, with regen brakes) checked at 75,000 miles, it still had ~70% of its brake pads left.
 

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I've put a couple hundred thousand miles on at least a half-dozen different EVs since 1997. I've never replaced a single friction braking system component on any of them. When I had my 2011 Volt (PHEV, with regen brakes) checked at 75,000 miles, it still had ~70% of its brake pads left.
I suspect every EV friction brakes in reverse, which also helps. I know from other forums that people who don't use their brakes often tend to have more problems with them siezing up due to disuse. All it takes to prevent this is very light brake action.
 

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The Model Y has 3 levels of regen. You can select it in the settings on the screen. I don't recall the names but it ranges from almost none to one-pedal driving. It sounds like the car you test drove was set to the strongest level.
 

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The Model Y has 3 levels of regen. You can select it in the settings on the screen. I don't recall the names but it ranges from almost none to one-pedal driving. It sounds like the car you test drove was set to the strongest level.
Tesla has varied the availability of user selectable regen settings. When we test drove at the Tesla dealer earlier this year, the demo model was not selectable (my wife doesn't care for one pedal driving in our EVs). When asked, the salesman said it was "because people were burning thru brake pads at the lower settings". Franchised dealers don't have a corner on salespeople spouting BS.
 

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I love, Love, LOVE the single-pedal driving mode ("L") in the Chevy Bolt.

Have the shifter in "D", and Bolts behave similarly to an ICE, but in "L", regen is quite aggressive, and will slow the Bolt to a stop. Also pull on the left steering wheel paddle, and regen is amazingly aggressive. I play a "game" when driving around town, and try to time my paddle pull to stop the Bolt at the limit line. It's pretty easy to never need to hit the brake pedal when in "L". I do press the brake when stopped, though, just to give the drivers behind me a heads up that traffic is stopping/stopped.

The GM engineers were wizards when they designed the "L"/paddle/regen/brake blending system in the Bolt. It's absolutely seamless. If you have a chance, drive a Bolt for a while. You'll be amazed at how it can be done.
You mean when the Bolt isn’t spontaneously combusting, right? GM spending nearly $12,000 per vehicle to replace the batteries is outright scary for when the batteries on that model and other BEVs run out of warranty. It’ll be like a balloon mortgage for whoever owns it at that point.
 

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Owner of a 2018 Clarity for the last 3 years and a one week old MYLR - Model Y Long Range Tesla.
Regen in the Tesla will take some time getting use to. Very strong. one pedal driving all the way.
After a week of driving the Tesla, I realize these are two very different cars. still enjoy sitting in the Clarity, but the Tesla
is a very different car. Power, comfortable and 100x the technology of the Clarity.
Will miss my first plug-in car, but moving on for now. with the money I saved driving the Clarity for the last 3 years and the money I hope to make selling,
the cost, even 2x that of the Clarity, is well worth it.
 

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Even with one electric motor, to fully stop a vehicle you have to run that motor in reverse at low speed. There simply isn't enough motor torque to bring the vehicle to a complete stop without spinning it backwards, which uses power.
You mean when the Bolt isn’t spontaneously combusting, right? GM spending nearly $12,000 per vehicle to replace the batteries is outright scary for when the batteries on that model and other BEVs run out of warranty. It’ll be like a balloon mortgage for whoever owns it at that point.
There have been about a dozen fires in Bolts. (Mostly in the 2019s.) That's out of about 140,000 units sold worldwide. Out of an abundance of caution, GM is replacing battery packs in most, if not all units.

I'm more concerned when I walk across Beach Blvd., near my home.

A few owners have driven the Bolt beyond 100,000 miles already, and are reporting an approximate 8% loss in its 235 mile range. When I get a new pack in my 2021 Premier, like all the rest of the pack replacements, my battery will have a brand-new 8 year, 100,000 mile warranty.

I'm personally pleased with both the performance of the vehicle, and the treatment I've received from GM. In April, GM paid me $41k for my 2017 Premier (15k miles) in a buyback, due to the recall. I turned around and bought a 2021 Premier for $29k off the same lot, and on the same day, I turned in my 2017.
 

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There have been about a dozen fires in Bolts. (Mostly in the 2019s.) That's out of about 140,000 units sold worldwide. Out of an abundance of caution, GM is replacing battery packs in most, if not all units.

I'm more concerned when I walk across Beach Blvd., near my home.

A few owners have driven the Bolt beyond 100,000 miles already, and are reporting an approximate 8% loss in its 235 mile range. When I get a new pack in my 2021 Premier, like all the rest of the pack replacements, my battery will have a brand-new 8 year, 100,000 mile warranty.

I'm personally pleased with both the performance of the vehicle, and the treatment I've received from GM. In April, GM paid me $41k for my 2017 Premier (15k miles) in a buyback, due to the recall. I turned around and bought a 2021 Premier for $29k off the same lot, and on the same day, I turned in my 2017.
Glad you like it. You’ll likely replace your car before the battery is out of warranty, but GM’s cited cost to replace it is prohibitive. If the battery costs do not improve, the energy revolution will be challenged.
 

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Glad you like it. You’ll likely replace your car before the battery is out of warranty, but GM’s cited cost to replace it is prohibitive. If the battery costs do not improve, the energy revolution will be challenged.
There's been a lot of discussion that because the vast majority of cells in a Bolt pack are not suffering from the manufacturing defect (due to a snafu on their LG productions lines), that the good cells can find a life-after-cars as a stationary energy storage solution. This could actually accelerate the use of local battery storage at EV charging stations, thereby making the economics of retail EV battery charging more attractive. High utility "demand charges" for excessive instantaneous power delivery can make installing a bank of EV chargers by the side of a road prohibitively expensive. A large battery bank of repurposed EV packs can be "trickle" charged at lower power levels (over time), then drawn from at a higher rate to charge a car quickly. Regardless if this specifically happens or not, we can rest assured that the recovered battery cells will not be scrapped, and will retain significant value for GM on a secondary market.

Lithium battery prices have already dropped like a stone over the last ten years, and the trend continues to be decidedly downward.

BTW, LG is bearing a significant portion of the Bolt recall costs.
 
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