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I am looking at a used 2018 Clarity. This would be my first PHEV after owning a couple of Priuses.

- Is it hard to get the Clarity serviced at a private mechanic? I am in the Chicago area and I prefer to avoid the dealer whenever possible.

- Anything specific I should look for when I test drive and inspect the car?

- Can I get by charging on standard 110 volts? Usual driving will be 3 miles each way for daily commute. Occasional 30 mile (round trip) drives on the weekend and very occasional 70 mile (round trip) drives (where I assume I will burn some gas on the way back.)

- Is car insurance more costly on this vehicle than on a more "mainstream" vehicle?

- Will any original Honda warranty transfer to me? Do you know what the warranty would be and if there is anything I need to do to transfer it?

- Anything else I should ask the seller (private party) or anything else I should know before buying?

Thanks in advance for any advice!
 

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I bought a used 2018, about 2.5 months ago. It is overall a really great car. It has great owner reviews, which was. in part, 1 of the reasons why I wanted 1. So far, I agree with the general consciences, that this is a great car. I love it!. It takes about 12: - 13:hours to charge on Level 1 (standard 110 volt wall outlet) charging @ about 3 - 4 miles per hour. Level 2 (Requires an electrician install for your home) will take about 2: - 3:hours of charging, & will charge @ a rate of about 15 - 20 miles per hour. These times are for charging from empty. If you're not @ a low state of charge, of course, it will take much less time to to charge. There are also many public charging stations available, in most parts of The U.S. Most of them do charge money to use, but there are a few free public charging networks, too. My electric bill has gone up around $50, however I save around $200. in gas... maybe more, the way fuel prices have been going up, that I was feeding my Civic. Charging @ home is the cheapest way to charge (aside from the free public chargers). The public charges that charge money are usually more expensive. Still cheaper than buying gas, but considerable more than your rates @ home. Volta is a free public network that offers Level 2 charging that I use often.
My commute to work is 26 miles, round trip, & I usually arrive back home with about 20 miles of electric range remaining, without charging @ work. So I never burn a drop of fuel going to & from work. So your 3 mile commute will obviously be no problem. The 30 mile trips should be no problem, either, unless you have a lot of hills on your route. That's only 4 more miles than my 26 mile round trip commute, & like I said, I usually arrive home with about 20 miles still in the bank. The 70 mile trip, you will have to burn some gas. However, it depends on what is more important to you. Time, or not burning gas. For those longer trips, that exceed your battery's range, you can also stop @ a public & top up. You don't have to charge to full, every time, unless you will need the full range. So maybe 1: - 1:15hours is enough to complete your trip. Also, sometimes there are charging stations, or if you have a stop where you'll spend significant time, such as @ work, even a Level 1 outlet can be useful. But if time is more important to you, you have the option of the gas engine. But I like to see how long I can go without using the gas engine. I love the challenge of it. Lol!
Now let's talk about you're home charging options. I live in a rental house, so I'm not paying an electrician to install a Level 2. So I rely in Level 1 charging @ home. It can be a little limiting, @ times, but for the most part, I don't notice it too much. I charge overnight, so unless I get in late, & then have to leave again early, there is usually plenty of time to still get a full charge. Even in those short nights, it's usually pretty close to full. If not, of course, there's still the gas engine. When I buy my own home, I'll defiantly invest in a Level 2 charger. In the mean time, there are times where I need to stop @ home, & then leave again, & with only Level 1 charging @ home, there's not enough time to get enough charge for my next trip. In that case, to stay off the gas engine, I'll stop @ a level 2 charger to top up to a higher state of charge, so that I don't arrive home with too low of a battery, to give my Level 1 home charger a head start. Lol!
Also, it comes in 2 trim lines. There's the base model & the Touring Package. If you like luxury, the Touring model is definitely the way to go. It includes leather interior, with swede on the dash & door panels, full climate control, with right & left temp settings, heated front seats, adaptive cruise control, & Lane Keeping Assist, which is like an auto-steer.

I hope that this helps you in making your decision. Good Clarity hunting.
 

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As for servicing - any mechanic can do the routine service: oil, filters, brakes, tires, etc...
The only time you need Honda is for software or specialized diagnostics like battery capacity tests, etc...

The big advantage to a PHEV is that your brakes will wear less than an ICE vehicle due to the regen of the EV motor.

Pro tips: Use the paddle regen to regain as much energy back into your EV. Coasting also generates power back into the EV. Don't drive with cabin heating.

I love my 2018 Clarity PHEV - 40,000 miles and still going strong, except for tires which is getting replaced this week.
 

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A little-known "secret" is that the OEM EVSE can run on either 120V AC or 240V AC. It was designed to be used in both the US and EU, so can be connected to 120V or 240V. (Economies of scale, on the part of the manufacturer.) At 240V, it can allow your Clarity to charge at twice the 120V rate. In the US, the plug on the end is a 5-15P, which is for the typical 120V 15A wall outlet. IIRC, the Honda OEM EVSE is capable of passing up to 12A at either 120V or 240V, for 1.44kW or 2.88kW charge power, respectively. Now, if there was only a way to convert the 5-15P plug on the end to one compatible with a 240V socket. Hmmmm.

Some home locations use natural gas for the clothes dryer, and there's an unused 240V 30A receptacle behind the dryer, that's just begging to send up to 24A* at 240V to an EV....

The post is not a recommendation to use your OEM EVSE in a non-standard manner. Doing so is at your own risk.

* 24A is 80% of 30A. The NEC states that a fixed, constant load on an electrical circuit shouldn't exceed 80% of the circuits designed capacity.
 

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- Anything specific I should look for when I test drive and inspect the car?
Be sure to ask if the owner has ever had any trouble with the car suddenly losing power. I have this problem occasionally when using the gas engine when climbing hills with no battery remaining, or in below-0 temps with no battery.

- Can I get by charging on standard 110 volts? Usual driving will be 3 miles each way for daily commute. Occasional 30 mile (round trip) drives on the weekend and very occasional 70 mile (round trip) drives (where I assume I will burn some gas on the way back.)
Yes, I have 50,000 miles on my 2018 Clarity and almost all of it powered by our 110 garage outlet. About 12 hours from empty to full charge. We've also taken it on long road trips and other than the mountains it's a super comfortable riding and driving car -- almost like a luxury sedan.

- Is car insurance more costly on this vehicle than on a more "mainstream" vehicle?
Not for us, altho here in Iowa the state charges an annual 'surcharge' on our registration to replace the gas tax money we're NOT paying to use gas.

- Will any original Honda warranty transfer to me? Do you know what the warranty would be and if there is anything I need to do to transfer it?
Any orginal warranty would transfer to you, but if the car was originally bought in '18 or '19 it's likely the 36,000/3 year warranty has run out already. The large batteries which power the car are warrantied for 8 years/80,000 miles I believe, except in CA it's 10 years.

I'll just add other than the occasional (and dangerous) loss of power we've experienced maybe 6 times in 4 years, this car has been wonderful and just what we were looking for: charged up every night with electricity from the solar panels on our garage and we've gone months without using any gas; yet versatile enough to drive comfortably for hundreds of miles a day without stopping except for quick gas fill-ups.


- Anything else I should ask the seller (private party) or anything else I should know before buying?
 

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- Anything specific I should look for when I test drive and inspect the car?
Be sure to ask if the owner has ever had any trouble with the car suddenly losing power. I have this problem occasionally when using the gas engine when climbing hills with no battery remaining, or in below-0 temps with no battery.

- Can I get by charging on standard 110 volts? Usual driving will be 3 miles each way for daily commute. Occasional 30 mile (round trip) drives on the weekend and very occasional 70 mile (round trip) drives (where I assume I will burn some gas on the way back.)
Yes, I have 50,000 miles on my 2018 Clarity and almost all of it powered by our 110 garage outlet. About 12 hours from empty to full charge. We've also taken it on long road trips and other than the mountains it's a super comfortable riding and driving car -- almost like a luxury sedan.

- Is car insurance more costly on this vehicle than on a more "mainstream" vehicle?
Not for us, altho here in Iowa the state charges an annual 'surcharge' on our registration to replace the gas tax money we're NOT paying to use gas.

- Will any original Honda warranty transfer to me? Do you know what the warranty would be and if there is anything I need to do to transfer it?
Any orginal warranty would transfer to you, but if the car was originally bought in '18 or '19 it's likely the 36,000/3 year warranty has run out already. The large batteries which power the car are warrantied for 8 years/80,000 miles I believe, except in CA it's 10 years.

I'll just add other than the occasional (and dangerous) loss of power we've experienced maybe 6 times in 4 years, this car has been wonderful and just what we were looking for: charged up every night with electricity from the solar panels on our garage and we've gone months without using any gas; yet versatile enough to drive comfortably for hundreds of miles a day without stopping except for quick gas fill-ups.


- Anything else I should ask the seller (private party) or anything else I should know before buying?
"Be sure to ask if the owner has ever had any trouble with the car suddenly losing power. I have this problem occasionally when using the gas engine when climbing hills with no battery remaining, or in below-0 temps with no battery. "

This is a known operating condition, and is easily avoided, by putting the Clarity PHEV in HV+ mode a couple miles before entering a climb, if SOC is low. If the Clarity already has over ~65% SOC, it will automatically drop back into HV mode, and manage itself.

This isn't necessarily a "problem", and avoidance simply requires a little pre-planning. The Chevy Volt PHEV operates in a similar fashion, with its "Mountain Mode".
 

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I hope you don't mind me piggy backing off your thread, but the similarities are eerie. I am also looking at an '18 Clarity Plug in Hybrid. I am also coming from a Prius.

Our driving patterns are very similar, down to work-commute, and then the occasional medium-distance drives.

I also share concerns about mechanics, not so much by choice like you. But, I am in a rural area, and the nearest Honda dealership is a fair distance away. So, it would be nice to know that any local mechanics should be able to help me with the basics. Luckily, the Prius is ubiquitous enough by this point that many of the local mechanics have a decent amount of experience working on them by this point. Not so much sure about the Clarity.

I am also pretty concerned about the insurance, as I have read some pretty sticker-shockish numbers. I definitely plan to run the numbers with my insurance before making any decisions.

I do have a couple of additional questions/scenarios if anyone would like to help:

1) We only have one exterior outlet on our home, and no garage, unfortunately. The outlet is of course on the complete opposite side of the driveway. So, I was thinking I would need to purchase an extension cord. My first question would be...is this doable and is it safe? I guess my second question would be...will an extension cord cut back on the charging speed? Honestly, I don't mind to park in the grass closer to the outlet if that's the best option.

2) The nearest charging station to me is about 30 miles away. Is there a way to turn the car to gas-only mode, so that I can preserve the electric charge? I have read about putting it in HV mode. But I presume that would still use at least some of the electric charge. I didn't know if there was a way to have it run exclusively on gas.
 

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1) We only have one exterior outlet on our home, and no garage, unfortunately. The outlet is of course on the complete opposite side of the driveway. So, I was thinking I would need to purchase an extension cord. My first question would be...is this doable and is it safe? I guess my second question would be...will an extension cord cut back on the charging speed? Honestly, I don't mind to park in the grass closer to the outlet if that's the best option.
Officially it is always stated to never use an extension cord. But if caution is used it should be okay. Important to use a heavy gauge cord because a lot of current will be carried. And use as short a cord as possible because longer cords create more resistance. Also find out what else is on the circuit that you will be plugging into, because you should avoid using anything else on that circuit while you are charging. And no, using an extension cord will not affect charging speed.

I assume that the outlet is protected from the weather, you will also need to protect the connection between the charge cable and the extension cable. They make small covers like the one in the first picture below, however the charge cable has a pretty large plug on the end and it may not fit into one of this type, so you might need to get an oversized cover like in the second photo.

Toy Product Rectangle Lego Plastic



Green Product Rectangle Automotive lighting Line


2) The nearest charging station to me is about 30 miles away.
There is no need to use a charging station. Assuming that you can charge at home, that is the only place that you will be charging. Although some people can charge at work. If you don't have enough charge to get to where you need to go, then you use gas, that's what a PHEV is designed for. Spending an hour or more sitting at a charging station defeats the purpose of owning a PHEV. Even if the charging station is free which most of them aren't. Unless there happens to be a free charging station at the store or restaurant where you will already be spending some time it would make sense, but that doesn't happen very often.

Is there a way to turn the car to gas-only mode, so that I can preserve the electric charge? I have read about putting it in HV mode. But I presume that would still use at least some of the electric charge. I didn't know if there was a way to have it run exclusively on gas.
Technically there is no need to preserve the EV charge. If you just drive the car and let it handle everything, it will start out in EV mode until the charge is used up. It then switches to normal hybrid mode, which is called HV mode, which uses both the gas engine and the electric motor just like a normal hybrid. There is no problem driving it this way. However some people like to manage things, which it gives you the option to do if you want to. For example if you will be driving in hills, HV mode will operate better if the battery is not empty. If you drive in hills with the battery depleted then the engine tends to work harder and can be noisier. Doesn't hurt the car at all, but for a more pleasant driving experience most people prefer to avoid driving in hills with an empty battery. This can be accomplished by pressing the HV button when you start out, which will use the gas engine even though you have EV miles remaining. This preserves most of the EV miles, not quite all of it but most of it which is usually enough. You can also switch to HV Charge mode which will increase the battery charge up to about half full. However HV Charge is normally not needed, it's normally just used in situations where you have run low on battery charge for some reason and have hills coming up later in the drive.
 

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I assume that the outlet is protected from the weather, you will also need to protect the connection between the charge cable and the extension cable. They make small covers like the one in the first picture below, however the charge cable has a pretty large plug on the end and it may not fit into one of this type, so you might need to get an oversized cover like in the second photo.

There is no need to use a charging station. Assuming that you can charge at home, that is the only place that you will be charging. Although some people can charge at work. If you don't have enough charge to get to where you need to go, then you use gas, that's what a PHEV is designed for. Spending an hour or more sitting at a charging station defeats the purpose of owning a PHEV. Even if the charging station is free which most of them aren't. Unless there happens to be a free charging station at the store or restaurant where you will already be spending some time it would make sense, but that doesn't happen very often.


Technically there is no need to preserve the EV charge. If you just drive the car and let it handle everything, it will start out in EV mode until the charge is used up. It then switches to normal hybrid mode, which is called HV mode, which uses both the gas engine and the electric motor just like a normal hybrid. There is no problem driving it this way. However some people like to manage things, which it gives you the option to do if you want to. For example if you will be driving in hills, HV mode will operate better if the battery is not empty. If you drive in hills with the battery depleted then the engine tends to work harder and can be noisier. Doesn't hurt the car at all, but for a more pleasant driving experience most people prefer to avoid driving in hills with an empty battery. This can be accomplished by pressing the HV button when you start out, which will use the gas engine even though you have EV miles remaining. This preserves most of the EV miles, not quite all of it but most of it which is usually enough. You can also switch to HV Charge mode which will increase the battery charge up to about half full. However HV Charge is normally not needed, it's normally just used in situations where you have run low on battery charge for some reason and have hills coming up later in the drive.
It is weather protected, but I just figured on only charging in good weather conditions. But, the plug information is so very helpful.

As far as using a charging station, the ones I am looking at ARE free. So, to me, charging at a station has the win-win of not paying for electricity at the house (as negligible as it may be) and the bigger plus is that it would be much quicker to do a full charge. I won't have a Level 2 charger, so I will be relying on Level 1. So to me, the combo of being able to charge the battery quicker and not have to pay for it...that's where my mind is at.

Hopefully my town will get with the program and get a charging station, but as of right now....not so much.
 

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It is weather protected, but I just figured on only charging in good weather conditions.
You can safely charge in any kind of weather even pouring rain, the chargers and the receptacle on the car that it plugs into are designed for that. Considering that unlike a PHEV, EV owners often have no choice but to charge regardless of the weather.

And there is no chance of getting a shock while it is raining because the EVSE will not start flowing current through the cable until it is fully plugged in. And the moment you press the trigger to release the plug from the car, the electricity stops.
As far as using a charging station, the ones I am looking at ARE free. So, to me, charging at a station has the win-win of not paying for electricity at the house (as negligible as it may be) and the bigger plus is that it would be much quicker to do a full charge. I won't have a Level 2 charger, so I will be relying on Level 1. So to me, the combo of being able to charge the battery quicker and not have to pay for it...that's where my mind is at.
But in my opinion even free it's not worth it if it takes an hour or two of your time to charge up, which is how long even level 2 chargers (at least the free ones) will usually take. If your car will already be parked there while you are inside shopping or eating or whatever then it makes sense, but driving even just a few of miles out of the way to a charging station, and then sitting in the car surfing the internet or whatever while it charges, just doesn't seem worth it to me. And I am generally pretty thrifty about such things even for small dollar amounts, but only if they don't take a lot of time.
I won't have a Level 2 charger, so I will be relying on Level 1.
That's another great thing about PHEV's which is that you really don't need level 2. most Clarity owners can get pretty much all the charging they need with level 1. Some owners have installed level 2, and it's nice to have, but it only makes economic sense if you are pretty sure you will be purchasing an EV while you are living in your current house.

With level 1 there will probably be occasions where you don't have enough time to charge all the miles you need that day, but that's usually pretty rare for most people it seems, and usually not really worth the several hundred dollars that it typically takes to upgrade to level2.
 

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You can safely charge in any kind of weather even pouring rain, the chargers and the receptacle on the car that it plugs into are designed for that. Considering that unlike a PHEV, EV owners often have no choice but to charge regardless of the weather.

And there is no chance of getting a shock while it is raining because the EVSE will not start flowing current through the cable until it is fully plugged in. And the moment you press the trigger to release the plug from the car, the electricity stops.

But in my opinion even free it's not worth it if it takes an hour or two of your time to charge up, which is how long even level 2 chargers (at least the free ones) will usually take. If your car will already be parked there while you are inside shopping or eating or whatever then it makes sense, but driving even just a few of miles out of the way to a charging station, and then sitting in the car surfing the internet or whatever while it charges, just doesn't seem worth it to me. And I am generally pretty thrifty about such things even for small dollar amounts, but only if they don't take a lot of time.

That's another great thing about PHEV's which is that you really don't need level 2. most Clarity owners can get pretty much all the charging they need with level 1. Some owners have installed level 2, and it's nice to have, but it only makes economic sense if you are pretty sure you will be purchasing an EV while you are living in your current house.

With level 1 there will probably be occasions where you don't have enough time to charge all the miles you need that day, but that's usually pretty rare for most people it seems, and usually not really worth the several hundred dollars that it typically takes to upgrade to level2.
There was a famous demonstration with the EV-1 in the late '90s. EV-1s and early RAV4-EVs used an inductive charger. After sealing up the vehicle except for the charge port, an entire EV-1 was submerged, plugged in, and charged successfully. I watched the demo multiple times 20-odd years ago, but am unable to find it today.
 

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Another use case of HV Charge mode (charging your battery to was it 60 or 70% max?) is if you rarely use gas and have to use it so you can fill it up with fresh gas. I was due for an oil change but only filled gas twice that year.
The engine will kick in automatically for like 5 minutes if you don't use gas for over a long period of time (few weeks). I started adding 1oz of Sta-bil every other gas fillup. Some people might say that I bought the wrong car, but actually I am fine with this as I know I can go long range whenever I want.
 

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Another use case of HV Charge mode (charging your battery to was it 60 or 70% max?) is if you rarely use gas and have to use it so you can fill it up with fresh gas. I was due for an oil change but only filled gas twice that year.
The engine will kick in automatically for like 5 minutes if you don't use gas for over a long period of time (few weeks). I started adding 1oz of Sta-bil every other gas fillup. Some people might say that I bought the wrong car, but actually I am fine with this as I know I can go long range whenever I want.
Just an interesting point. I went ten months before adding gas and any time the ICE ran during that time period, it ran just fine.
 

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I hope you don't mind me piggy backing off your thread, but the similarities are eerie. I am also looking at an '18 Clarity Plug in Hybrid. I am also coming from a Prius.

Our driving patterns are very similar, down to work-commute, and then the occasional medium-distance drives.

I also share concerns about mechanics, not so much by choice like you. But, I am in a rural area, and the nearest Honda dealership is a fair distance away. So, it would be nice to know that any local mechanics should be able to help me with the basics. Luckily, the Prius is ubiquitous enough by this point that many of the local mechanics have a decent amount of experience working on them by this point. Not so much sure about the Clarity.

I am also pretty concerned about the insurance, as I have read some pretty sticker-shockish numbers. I definitely plan to run the numbers with my insurance before making any decisions.

I do have a couple of additional questions/scenarios if anyone would like to help:

1) We only have one exterior outlet on our home, and no garage, unfortunately. The outlet is of course on the complete opposite side of the driveway. So, I was thinking I would need to purchase an extension cord. My first question would be...is this doable and is it safe? I guess my second question would be...will an extension cord cut back on the charging speed? Honestly, I don't mind to park in the grass closer to the outlet if that's the best option.

2) The nearest charging station to me is about 30 miles away. Is there a way to turn the car to gas-only mode, so that I can preserve the electric charge? I have read about putting it in HV mode. But I presume that would still use at least some of the electric charge. I didn't know if there was a way to have it run exclusively on gas.
The simple answer to question #2 is YES, to preserve your electric charge simply push the HV button and the car will use its gas engine. When in that mode, usually little or no electric/battery miles will be used. However, if you're driving at extremely fast speeds, or over long, steep mountain inclines, the car will access the battery to draw extra power and you'll see some of your battery miles diminish.
 

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Another use case of HV Charge mode (charging your battery to was it 60 or 70% max?) is if you rarely use gas and have to use it so you can fill it up with fresh gas. I was due for an oil change but only filled gas twice that year.
The engine will kick in automatically for like 5 minutes if you don't use gas for over a long period of time (few weeks). I started adding 1oz of Sta-bil every other gas fillup. Some people might say that I bought the wrong car, but actually I am fine with this as I know I can go long range whenever I want.
Also understand, that like the vast majority of modern ICE vehicle, the fuel system in the Clarity PHEV is sealed, so the problem of aging gasoline is greatly reduced.
 

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To continue this thread....

I'm looking at purchasing a 2018 Clarity as well.
I don't know anything about these cars.. aside from what research I've done up to this point.

Does anyone see any issues with purchasing a 2018 Clarity Touring with 47,000 miles?
Anything I should look out for?

If I purchase this car, I'll probably go beserk replacing all the fluids, coolant, brake fluid, CVT fluid, etc.. just so I know what's in there and get it to a 'Known Good' state.

I suppose I'm a bit hesitant because the vehicle has been discontinued.. the usual questions about parts availability, mechanical maintenance and repairs.. that sort of thing.

Any advice anyone has would be quite appreciated!

Cheers.. and hello from Tennessee!

-Hinoki
 

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To continue this thread....

I'm looking at purchasing a 2018 Clarity as well.
I don't know anything about these cars.. aside from what research I've done up to this point.

Does anyone see any issues with purchasing a 2018 Clarity Touring with 47,000 miles?
Anything I should look out for?

If I purchase this car, I'll probably go beserk replacing all the fluids, coolant, brake fluid, CVT fluid, etc.. just so I know what's in there and get it to a 'Known Good' state.

I suppose I'm a bit hesitant because the vehicle has been discontinued.. the usual questions about parts availability, mechanical maintenance and repairs.. that sort of thing.

Any advice anyone has would be quite appreciated!

Cheers.. and hello from Tennessee!

-Hinoki
The Clarity PHEV does not have a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). Honda uses "eCVT" in their marketing materials, but it's grossly mis-named. It has no resemblance to what the automotive industry calls a "CVT".

If you are curious as to what performs the magic in the Clarity PHEV drive train, you can do no better than to watch the videos by Professor Kelly at Weber State University.

The Honda Hybrid E-Drive is shared among several models besides the Clarity PHEV, and Professor Kelly makes operation of a complex device relatively easy to understand.


I'd also recommend asking questions via the search bar at the top of this forum's pages. I'd be willing to bet the vast majority of your questions have been answered several times before. It's just a matter of finding them.

Of course, if you have questions not found in these fora, there is a wealth of information represented in the minds of many other users here. Just ask.

Good luck in your quest for a Clarity PHEV. They're great vehicles.
 

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@EV Nerd , it's been a while since I derped quite like that, so thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

Looking at the video you sent, I'm actually quite relieved; I'm not a fan of CVT's in general and to find that this one as you put it, ISN'T one.. more's the better.

So I found the car on CarMax, having it shipped from South Carolina to where I'm at.
Looks to be the red color.. I'm color-blind, so that could be red, could be green.. eh, who knows? It's a good looking car, no matter the color.

47,000 miles.. maintenance records look good, and asking price is 28,999.
I'd ask what you'd recommend I look for, but I won't derp twice like that.. I'll do some searching. my normal is to just replace all the fluids both so I know they've been done, and also to keep me out of trouble over a weekend or two.

I go see the car this Sunday.. and likely will purchase it then.

So many questions I'd ask, but due diligence and research must be done first.

That said, if you have any thoughts or suggestions, I'd certainly like to hear them.

First things I intend to do to the car that isn't maintenance related:
1) Level 2 charger. Leaning to the Morec 16/32 amp. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07Q6X7K5K/ref=ewc_pr_img_1?smid=A1YV2BHHKZX2F&psc=1 )
2)70% Ceramic tint. It'd help keep the car cool and cuts the glare.
3) Haven't decided if I'll do a full paint correction and apply a ceramic coating or let the professionals do it.
4) Tires. I'm leaning to Michelin Cross-Climate 2's. Expensive, but fantastic in wet, dry, and snow. I've had them in the past, and love it.

Anyway, if I do wind up getting the car this Sunday, I'll make a more formalized introduction post with pictures. Of the car, not me. Nobody needs to see THAT.

-Hinoki
 

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2021 PHEV Touring HB, CA
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@EV Nerd , it's been a while since I derped quite like that, so thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

Looking at the video you sent, I'm actually quite relieved; I'm not a fan of CVT's in general and to find that this one as you put it, ISN'T one.. more's the better.

So I found the car on CarMax, having it shipped from South Carolina to where I'm at.
Looks to be the red color.. I'm color-blind, so that could be red, could be green.. eh, who knows? It's a good looking car, no matter the color.

47,000 miles.. maintenance records look good, and asking price is 28,999.
I'd ask what you'd recommend I look for, but I won't derp twice like that.. I'll do some searching. my normal is to just replace all the fluids both so I know they've been done, and also to keep me out of trouble over a weekend or two.

I go see the car this Sunday.. and likely will purchase it then.

So many questions I'd ask, but due diligence and research must be done first.

That said, if you have any thoughts or suggestions, I'd certainly like to hear them.

First things I intend to do to the car that isn't maintenance related:
1) Level 2 charger. Leaning to the Morec 16/32 amp. (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07Q6X7K5K/ref=ewc_pr_img_1?smid=A1YV2BHHKZX2F&psc=1 )
2)70% Ceramic tint. It'd help keep the car cool and cuts the glare.
3) Haven't decided if I'll do a full paint correction and apply a ceramic coating or let the professionals do it.
4) Tires. I'm leaning to Michelin Cross-Climate 2's. Expensive, but fantastic in wet, dry, and snow. I've had them in the past, and love it.

Anyway, if I do wind up getting the car this Sunday, I'll make a more formalized introduction post with pictures. Of the car, not me. Nobody needs to see THAT.

-Hinoki
I caution you about EVSEs that are made in China, and haven't met UL requirements. (CE is for the EU, and FCC just means it doesn't radiate excessive EM radiation above a certain threshold.) Your Clarity should come with its own OEM EVSE that's ostensibly intended to run on 120V AC at 12A. A little-known "secret" is that it will also run on 240V AC, with a plug adapter. This is because the OEM EVSE was designed to work in both the USA (120V, 60Hz AC) and the EU (230V, 50Hz AC), with simply a plug change at the factory. (Economies of scale, and all that.) Many on this list (including myself) use it this way with no problem, but of course, should you do so, it's at your own risk. Using the OEM EVSE at 240V will put approximately 10 miles of EV range (~2.8kWh) into the battery every hour. This should fill the battery from zero in about five hours. Many find that this is very adequate for the job, without going to the expense of purchasing a higher current L2 EVSE. You'd still need a dedicated 240V 15A circuit, though. Many people have an unused 240V 30A receptacle behind their clothes dryer, should their dryer run on natural gas. The dryer circuit can also be shared between an electric dryer and an up to 24A EVSE with a device that will automatically switch between the loads. One such example is the "Dryer Buddy", but there are others. Note that National Electrical Code requirements dictate that a constant load (like that presented by a charging EV) cannot exceed 80% of an electrical circuit's designed capacity, which is why an EVSE should not pass more than 24A to the EV on a 30A circuit. To get 32A, the circuit would need to be designed for 40A, at a minimum. (A circuit's capacity is determined by the breaker, wiring and receptacle.) If this sounds overly daunting (some concern is good), hire a licensed electrician to do any electrical work.

I've had my '21 Touring ceramic coated, and it looks absolutely amazing. I'm having 50% tint applied to the side and back windows in a couple of weeks. I hesitate to have darker tint applied, as the legal limit in California is 70% on the front windows and windshield.

Understand that changing tires to something other than the OEM-specified Low Rolling Resistance (LRR) type can negatively impact driving range. Some find the trade-off of range for performance and comfort worth it. YMMV...literally.

Enjoy your "new" clarity, and welcome to the forum.
 

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Hey, it's new to me so it still counts!

Would this be the right adapter?

Looks like it'd work, and if the EVSE that comes with the car works at 240v with this thing, then so much the better!

-Hinoki
 
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