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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand that all of these are linked, so I don't know which component is the issue, but they are all out, and the warning lights continue all the time I'm driving. Fortunately i bought a 120K warranty, and they tell me it's covered, Problem is those parts are unavailable with -0- indication of when the parts might be available. i actually don't care about the lane assist thing- I find that completely annoying- but the cruise control and other safety features, plus the constant warning lights and signals are a huge distraction, so I'll get it fixed.

Has anyone else experienced either this issue, or the lack of available electronics from Honda? if so, how did it resolve?
 

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Our 2020 Clarity suffered squirrel damage as described in an earlier post. The following paragraph is copied from an earlier post.

Our 2020 PHEV has been showing an emission or exhaust warning for about a year. The dealer can't ID the source. This car was charged outside for it's first 10 months and was severely damage by squirrels. They chewed up wiring harnesses both in front and back. Six weeks later, with shipping delays and other complications, we got the car back. I cleared a spot in the garage to charge it. The phantom error message appeared soon after the repair. Right now it is reading emissions system problem. It has also come up as an exhaust problem. The errors come up at all times, even with no ICE usage. Occasionally it disappears. But returns after a brief period. Has anyone else experienced any warnings like this?

When we found the damage, the car was going through every error message it knew. But it still drove into the dealer but with no transmission or whatever to help accelerate from a stop. Maybe have the mechanic take a deep dive on wiring to look for physical damage or loose connection. It might not be as obvious as my squirrel damage.

After about a year, the phantom error message noted above was corrected by replacing an electronic valve in one of the cooling systems.
 

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I understand that all of these are linked, so I don't know which component is the issue, but they are all out, and the warning lights continue all the time I'm driving. Fortunately i bought a 120K warranty, and they tell me it's covered, Problem is those parts are unavailable with -0- indication of when the parts might be available. i actually don't care about the lane assist thing- I find that completely annoying- but the cruise control and other safety features, plus the constant warning lights and signals are a huge distraction, so I'll get it fixed.

Has anyone else experienced either this issue, or the lack of available electronics from Honda? if so, how did it resolve?
Have the same issue. I have a 2018 plug in hybrid clarity. I an actually looking or searching online for a solution on this issue. I don’t want to take it to the dealership yet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Have the same issue. I have a 2018 plug in hybrid clarity. I an actually looking or searching online for a solution on this issue. I don’t want to take it to the dealership yet.
Fortunately mine was covered under the warranty- i bought a 120K warranty when I got the car, and i was at 106K. Apparently these do tend to crap out at about 100K, and the dealers don't have an ability to repair them- they just replace at about $1,500. It's a system I don't use other than the cruise control, but the emergency braking system is a good safety feature as well.
 

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I understand that all of these are linked, so I don't know which component is the issue, but they are all out, and the warning lights continue all the time I'm driving. Fortunately i bought a 120K warranty, and they tell me it's covered, Problem is those parts are unavailable with -0- indication of when the parts might be available. i actually don't care about the lane assist thing- I find that completely annoying- but the cruise control and other safety features, plus the constant warning lights and signals are a huge distraction, so I'll get it fixed.

Has anyone else experienced either this issue, or the lack of available electronics from Honda? if so, how did it resolve?
I have the same issue. I think its my 12V battery that's running low. I've been trying to charge it by running on HV mode and HV charging but it doesn't look like it helps that much! What's the CCA for your battery? Mine is 310 A but looking at the replacement battery, they are all rated at 500 A so I don't know if I just happen to have a small battery when I bought the car :unsure:
 

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I have the same issue. I think its my 12V battery that's running low. I've been trying to charge it by running on HV mode and HV charging but it doesn't look like it helps that much!
Being in HV mode or not makes no difference, because the battery is not charged by the gas engine, it is charged by the DC-DC converter which converts the high voltage electricity of the HV battery into 12V power for the 12V part of the car's electrical system. You can sort of imagine the DC-DC converter as doing the same job as the alternator of a regular car, however in this case the engine doesn't need to be running for it to work.

The 12V battery gets charged anytime that the car is in READY mode (basically any time that you have the car on). It also gets charged whenever the HV battery is being charged. Note that just because the charge cable is plugged in does not mean the 12V battery is getting charged, as it only gets charged during the period of time that the HV battery is being charged.

Mine is 310 A but looking at the replacement battery, they are all rated at 500 A so I don't know if I just happen to have a small battery when I bought the car
They come with small capacity batteries because that's all that is needed. As is the case with all hybrids, the engine is not started by a traditional starter motor powered by the 12V battery, the engine is started by the starter/generator motor which is powered by the HV battery. The only thing the 12V battery does is power up the 12V system prior to the start of charging, and that takes very little power. That's why the little portable jump start batteries work so well on hybrids (although they do a reasonable job on gas powered cars also depending on the circumstances)
 

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Being in HV mode or not makes no difference, because the battery is not charged by the gas engine, it is charged by the DC-DC converter which converts the high voltage electricity of the HV battery into 12V power for the 12V part of the car's electrical system. You can sort of imagine the DC-DC converter as doing the same job as the alternator of a regular car, however in this case the engine doesn't need to be running for it to work.

The 12V battery gets charged anytime that the car is in READY mode (basically any time that you have the car on). It also gets charged whenever the HV battery is being charged. Note that just because the charge cable is plugged in does not mean the 12V battery is getting charged, as it only gets charged during the period of time that the HV battery is being charged.


They come with small capacity batteries because that's all that is needed. As is the case with all hybrids, the engine is not started by a traditional starter motor powered by the 12V battery, the engine is started by the starter/generator motor which is powered by the HV battery. The only thing the 12V battery does is power up the 12V system prior to the start of charging, and that takes very little power. That's why the little portable jump start batteries work so well on hybrids (although they do a reasonable job on gas powered cars also depending on the circumstances)
Ok so basically I just need to turn the car on and leave it in "Ready" mode for it to recharge the 12V battery? Regarding the engine starting, if what you said was true, then how come I couldn't start my car last time when my 12V battery was dead? My HV battery was full at that time but I still was not able to start my car so I had to jump start the 12V battery.
 

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Ok so basically I just need to turn the car on and leave it in "Ready" mode for it to recharge the 12V battery?
That is correct. It will use up a few miles of EV range during this time, which is no problem because if it gets to 0 miles the gas engine will come on to recharge the HV battery. The engine will come on for a minute or so about every five or ten minutes. Be sure the car is not in an enclosed space during this time, or if it is then be sure to periodically go out the car and make sure that your EV miles are not getting too low.

Regarding the engine starting, if what you said was true, then how come I couldn't start my car last time when my 12V battery was dead? My HV battery was full at that time but I still was not able to start my car so I had to jump start the 12V battery.
The 12V system has to power up first, then the 12V system activates the HV system, only then can the HV system crank the engine. So the 12V battery is required to start the car as it initiates the first step in that process.
 

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Being in HV mode or not makes no difference, because the battery is not charged by the gas engine, it is charged by the DC-DC converter which converts the high voltage electricity of the HV battery into 12V power for the 12V part of the car's electrical system. You can sort of imagine the DC-DC converter as doing the same job as the alternator of a regular car, however in this case the engine doesn't need to be running for it to work.

The 12V battery gets charged anytime that the car is in READY mode (basically any time that you have the car on). It also gets charged whenever the HV battery is being charged. Note that just because the charge cable is plugged in does not mean the 12V battery is getting charged, as it only gets charged during the period of time that the HV battery is being charged.


They come with small capacity batteries because that's all that is needed. As is the case with all hybrids, the engine is not started by a traditional starter motor powered by the 12V battery, the engine is started by the starter/generator motor which is powered by the HV battery. The only thing the 12V battery does is power up the 12V system prior to the start of charging, and that takes very little power. That's why the little portable jump start batteries work so well on hybrids (although they do a reasonable job on gas powered cars also depending on the circumstances)
That is great information, really appreciate it. I understand the gas motor is really only to charge the battery, and the "propulsion" is strictly from the electric motor. Is this correct?
 

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That is great information, really appreciate it. I understand the gas motor is really only to charge the battery, and the "propulsion" is strictly from the electric motor. Is this correct?
There's a little more variety than just that. The gas engine turns a generator to produce electricity, that electricity then goes either to the battery to recharge it, or directly to the electric motor that drives the wheels. Or both at the same time. Also when cruising above around 40 mph the gas engine can power the wheels directly using a single overdrive gear, and not use the electric motor at all.
 
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