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I also didn't factor in for temperature variances in battery capacity.

Come on - the numbers I posted are for reference only.

However, you are incorrect that the car will only use a portion of the battery. When I test drove a car at the dealer, it was low on gas and low on charge, we ran the gas out of the car, and then drove the car until it stopped and we got an error that said something like battery state fault or something like that (don't remember). This happened about two blocks from the dealer and I had to sit in the car with the sales guy and wait for one of their shop guys to show up with gas.

So technically you CAN drive the battery to zero.
0% SOC is not likely the point where the battery is fully depleted, just as 100% SOC is not the level where the battery is full.

0 EV miles is about 10% SOC. Normally when driving in HV mode it lets SOC get down to about 7% SOC then it starts ICE and charges back up to about 10%. However when parked with the AC on it will let SOC drop to as low as 1% before ICE comes on, then it charges a few percent then shuts off again. If you don't have any gas like in your situation, then as you were driving I am guessing that it continued below 7% and then threw the error up at 1%, or maybe it went down a little more to 0% before it shut off. But that should still be with at least some amount of charge available because fully depleting the battery would be very damaging and it would be very unlikely that they didn't design the system to protect from that.
 

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0% SOC is not likely the point where the battery is fully depleted, just as 100% SOC is not the level where the battery is full.

0 EV miles is about 10% SOC. Normally when driving in HV mode it lets SOC get down to about 7% SOC then it starts ICE and charges back up to about 10%. However when parked with the AC on it will let SOC drop to as low as 1% before ICE comes on, then it charges a few percent then shuts off again. If you don't have any gas like in your situation, then as you were driving I am guessing that it continued below 7% and then threw the error up at 1%, or maybe it went down a little more to 0% before it shut off. But that should still be with at least some amount of charge available because fully depleting the battery would be very damaging and it would be very unlikely that they didn't design the system to protect from that.
The SOC% numbers you are quoting only pertain to the portion of the battery that is "usable". Only about 13 kWh of the 17 kWh total capacity of the battery is "seen" by the car.
 

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The SOC% numbers you are quoting only pertain to the portion of the battery that is "usable". Only about 13 kWh of the 17 kWh total capacity of the battery is "seen" by the car.
Yes I referred to that in my opening sentence:

"0% SOC is not likely the point where the battery is fully depleted, just as 100% SOC is not the level where the battery is full."

I only hesitated with the word "likely" for 0% because whereas people have reported voltage readings at 100% that clearly indicate the battery is not fully charged, I don't know of anyone who has voltage readings at 0% because I have never heard of anyone actually reaching 0% SOC. ICE normally turns on when you get down to about 7%, although when sitting parked it can go as low as 1%. So in theory 0% SOC is the true bottom, but I highly doubt that, I expect the reserve extends below 0%.
 

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I have a Lectron 32A unit. the display shows the actual amps being used at any given time and the kilowatt hours. It is interesting to note that the amperage changes during the charging process. Mine takes 2-2.5 hours.
 

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I have a Lectron 32A unit. the display shows the actual amps being used at any given time and the kilowatt hours. It is interesting to note that the amperage changes during the charging process. Mine takes 2-2.5 hours.
Yep, the fuller the battery, the slower the remaining charge. All things being equal.
 

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Yep, the fuller the battery, the slower the remaining charge. All things being equal.
And that brings up another interesting point. Maybe someone has already mentioned this. If you “top off” your battery every night so you have a 100% charge every morning then it will take awhile after you first start driving it for the day before you will be able to use regenerative braking to its fullest. In fact, my theory is that you’ll use your mechanical brakes more this way. If you only drive 10-20 miles a day then you may want to wait 3-4 days between charges.
 

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And that brings up another interesting point. Maybe someone has already mentioned this. If you “top off” your battery every night so you have a 100% charge every morning then it will take awhile after you first start driving it for the day before you will be able to use regenerative braking to its fullest. In fact, my theory is that you’ll use your mechanical brakes more this way. If you only drive 10-20 miles a day then you may want to wait 3-4 days between charges.
Elon Musk recommends charge to 90% to 95% for that very reason, stating "At 100% state of charge, regen braking doesn't work, because the battery is full, so car is less energy efficient."

However that's easier to do with a Tesla where you can set the maximum charge percent. With the Clarity unless you have an EVSE that does scheduled charging then you have to use the HondaLink app each time you charge. It's not that hard to do, and with a little bit of practice you can figure out in your head how much charging time you need. But understandably not everyone is going to go through that effort, it's a lot easier to just plug it in when you get home and let it charge to full.

Also the longer range of an EV means that unless you go on a trip you most likely won't need a full charge. Whereas with the smaller EV range of the Clarity it is sometimes harder to predict whether you will need a full charge the next day. When I know I will be driving farther than my EV range I charge to full. But there are many days when I know I won't be driving more than about 25 miles so on those days I don't charge to full.

Your suggestion is a good one also, for someone who doesn't want to bother with scheduled charging, simply don't plug in if you have enough charge for the next day's driving. That does mean there will still be days where you charge to 100% when you don't need it, but at least you are reducing the number of times that happens.
 

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hat does mean there will still be days where you charge to 100%
You cannot charge a Clarity to "100%" - The BMS does not allow it.

Tesla recommends charging to a lower level because they have done everything they can to publish to highest range ratings possible. Part of that involves opening up a higher actual charge percentage and then telling people not to use it.
Li-Ion cells at a true full charge are specced at 4.2V. Honda stops charging at a touch under 4.1V. Tesla charges them to 4.15V. May not sound like much but it makes a big difference in longevity (capacity is a function of "area under the curve" and not a linear percentage of voltage)

As to the changing amperage - batteries are charged initially at a constant current and then at a constant voltage at higher SOC.
768
 

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You cannot charge a Clarity to "100%" - The BMS does not allow it.
Correct, as mentioned in posts #61 and #63 above. In discussions here most people already know that. But it's certainly worth mentioning again from time to time as new forum members who have recently joined may not know this. I would guess that Elon expected that most people who read his tweet understood that when he said "100% state of charge" he was referring to displayed SOC, not total battery capacity.

Sort of like nearly everyone uses the term "charger" or "charge cable" when referring to their EVSE, when in fact the actual charger is in the car (unless using DC charging which is not available for Clarity PHEV in the U.S.). It's usually clear from the context of posts that when someone says charger they mean EVSE. But it's good to occasionally mention it for new people who are not aware of what the actual functions of the components is.
 

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The Bolt ('20 and '21) allows you to set the maximum charge level in 5% increments. I've set mine to 95%, just so it behaves the same regen-wise, every time. After enjoying one-pedal driving pretty much all of the time, suddenly having nearly zero regen, after a charge, on a vehicle that has a fairly aggressive regen function is "disconcerting" to say the least. I only charge to 100% when I need the extra range. Several owners try to keep their battery pack between 40% and 80% SOC, because some battery experts claim it optimizes lithium ion battery longevity.

'17 to '19 Bolts have a function called "Hilltop Reserve" instead of a selectable option. When invoked, the vehicle charges to something around 90%. This is so people who live at the top of a hill can get the regen they're used to on their way down, at the beginning of a trip.
 

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The most common commercial service is 120/208 volt wye, so public chargers are often 208V and not 240


While the Clarity is often listed as having a 32A on-board charger, in reality it seems to max out at 30A. 208V @ 30A = 6.7kW, so the public EVSE you connect to is likely a 32A unit (but it is at least 30A).

If you haven't had the charging software update done, that could be the cause of failing to charge on the Clipper Creek.
What is the charging software update? Does it fix the stupid schedule crap where it won't charge if you plug it in after the start time?
 

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What is the charging software update? Does it fix the stupid schedule crap where it won't charge if you plug it in after the start time?
that happens to me all the time! is it because of SmartCharge feature in the Hondalink app, or the actual software in the car?
is the phev Claritiy's charging software user-upgradable?
 

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that happens to me all the time! is it because of SmartCharge feature in the Hondalink app, or the actual software in the car?
is the phev Claritiy's charging software user-upgradable?
I am not at all familiar with the scheduling software in the Clarity as I let my EVSE choose the correct time for the charge. But I’m guessing the reason that it won’t start charging if you plug it in after the scheduled start time is that it assumes the start time is for the next day or week. i.e. if your schedule says to start charging at 10 PM and you plug the vehicle in at 10:05 PM it just logically thinks you mean 10 PM the next day.
 

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that happens to me all the time! is it because of SmartCharge feature in the Hondalink app, or the actual software in the car?
is the phev Claritiy's charging software user-upgradable?
That's the way it works. At least regular scheduled charging. I couldn't tell from your post if you have SmartCharge enabled, as that works differently. I'll come back to SmartCharge in a moment, but first regular scheduling is built into the car, in fact you can go into the information menu on the instrument panel (it's under the gear icon) and set the charge schedule there. In case you haven't noticed, whenever you turn off the car it shows the current charge schedule on the instrument panel.

You can also set the charge schedule remotely using the HondaLink app. The remote scheduling is done though the Internet so you don't even need to be in the same location as the car to set the schedule. Sometimes HondaLink has a problem connecting, usually closing the app and restarting it fixes it, but if it still doesn't connect you can always go out to the car and set the schedule in the information menu.

As you experienced, if you plug in after the scheduled start time, it won't start charging. The simplest option in that case is to use the key fob to start charging. Starting with the keyfob will charge to full, even if you have the schedule set to stop at a certain time. If you want it to stop charging at a certain time, then instead of starting charging with the keyfob, go into the timer schedule (either in the car or in HondaLink) and change the start time to five minutes from now, but keep the ending time the same. Once charging starts a few minutes later, you can go back into the schedule and change the start time back to the original if it's a schedule that you run every day.

SmartCharge is completely different. And not necessarily in good ways. It's purpose is to charge during times of lowest CO2 emission, which varies each day. It attempts to follow your charge schedule as it does this, but most people's experience is that it fails to charge more often than not and they wind up using gas when they shouldn't have needed to because they didn't get enough charging. SmartCharge is disabled as a default. If you have enabled it and decide you don't like it you can go back into the HondaLink vehicle settings and disable it, then it will go back to the regular scheduled charging.
 

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Another vote for juice box - there are advantages to juice box wifi 40 - if you get a car that can accept a bigger charge load you are set for the future, you can control things wirelessly from your phone app anywhere in the world, if you have more than one juicebox which I do you can also control the max load between the two units - I have a solar system and like to control that way I can utilize primarily only my solar electricity to charge my phev's. I bought mine on E-bay new at a good discount. Hope this helps!
JuiceBox Pro 40 Smart Electric Vehicle (EV) Charging Station with WiFi - 40 amp Level 2 EVSE, 24-foot cable, UL and Energy Star Certified, Indoor/Outdoor Use

Works fine.
 

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That's the way it works. At least regular scheduled charging. I couldn't tell from your post if you have SmartCharge enabled, as that works differently. I'll come back to SmartCharge in a moment, but first regular scheduling is built into the car, in fact you can go into the information menu on the instrument panel (it's under the gear icon) and set the charge schedule there. In case you haven't noticed, whenever you turn off the car it shows the current charge schedule on the instrument panel.

You can also set the charge schedule remotely using the HondaLink app. The remote scheduling is done though the Internet so you don't even need to be in the same location as the car to set the schedule. Sometimes HondaLink has a problem connecting, usually closing the app and restarting it fixes it, but if it still doesn't connect you can always go out to the car and set the schedule in the information menu.

As you experienced, if you plug in after the scheduled start time, it won't start charging. The simplest option in that case is to use the key fob to start charging. Starting with the keyfob will charge to full, even if you have the schedule set to stop at a certain time. If you want it to stop charging at a certain time, then instead of starting charging with the keyfob, go into the timer schedule (either in the car or in HondaLink) and change the start time to five minutes from now, but keep the ending time the same. Once charging starts a few minutes later, you can go back into the schedule and change the start time back to the original if it's a schedule that you run every day.

SmartCharge is completely different. And not necessarily in good ways. It's purpose is to charge during times of lowest CO2 emission, which varies each day. It attempts to follow your charge schedule as it does this, but most people's experience is that it fails to charge more often than not and they wind up using gas when they shouldn't have needed to because they didn't get enough charging. SmartCharge is disabled as a default. If you have enabled it and decide you don't like it you can go back into the HondaLink vehicle settings and disable it, then it will go back to the regular scheduled charging.
I thought I was "doing the right thing" to enable SmartCharge. Big mistake, as you mentioned. I couldn't disable it fast enough.

Today, I got a survey from Honda about SmartCharge. I was brutally honest. Some might even say unkind.
 

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Do any of these Type 2 chargers have changeable plugs? We have a 2108 clarity touring PHEV and love it. But I was thinking about getting a second all electric Hyundai Ioniq which uses a different plug. I would like a type two charger for my home that could charge both.
 

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Do any of these Type 2 chargers have changeable plugs? We have a 2108 clarity touring PHEV and love it. But I was thinking about getting a second all electric Hyundai Ioniq which uses a different plug. I would like a type two charger for my home that could charge north.
What you are seeing on the Ioniq is a CCS charging port which is capable of both level 2 and DC fast charging. When using a level 2 charger you plug it into the top half of the CCS port.
 
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