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The Clarity PHEV has only been around since late 2017, making even the oldest and highest mileage examples not yet ready for a battery replacement. But I was wondering: when the batteries are in need of replacing, what will the options be? I know there is a battery warranty still in effect on all existent vehicles, but what about after that? Will Honda be able to make them if there aren't OEM packs laying around in a parts warehouse somewhere, or will we have to resort to a third party fashioning a 17kwh replacement?

I read somewhere that lithium ion batteries will soon cost about $100 US/kwh, which would make a replacement pack far less costly than changing out a typical BEV's giant battery array (and that's assuming that the cost won't continue to go down, which presumably will be the case). So, I'm hoping that keeping the Clarity on the road 10+ years from now won't be a cost-prohibitive proposition. I have every intention of keeping my Clarity on the road for as long as possible. My parents bought a 1983 Honda Accord Special Edition new and it stayed on the road until about '03/'04, until my friend was about to buy it and found that it had a level of underbody rot that would render it unable to pass safety inspection. I Hope for my Clarity to have a similar lifespan.

Another thought: 10+ years from now, lithium-ion batteries will probably be old tech. If there are next-gen batteries available when the world's Clarity's batteries are dying, will those be compatible? It would be cool if a pack could be fashioned to fit the Clarity, and it would give it way over the ~45 mile range it currently has. I wonder if that would blow the guess-o-meter's mind!
 

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The Clarity PHEV has only been around since late 2017, making even the oldest and highest mileage examples not yet ready for a battery replacement. But I was wondering: when the batteries are in need of replacing, what will the options be? I know there is a battery warranty still in effect on all existent vehicles, but what about after that? Will Honda be able to make them if there aren't OEM packs laying around in a parts warehouse somewhere, or will we have to resort to a third party fashioning a 17kwh replacement?

I read somewhere that lithium ion batteries will soon cost about $100 US/kwh, which would make a replacement pack far less costly than changing out a typical BEV's giant battery array (and that's assuming that the cost won't continue to go down, which presumably will be the case). So, I'm hoping that keeping the Clarity on the road 10+ years from now won't be a cost-prohibitive proposition. I have every intention of keeping my Clarity on the road for as long as possible. My parents bought a 1983 Honda Accord Special Edition new and it stayed on the road until about '03/'04, until my friend was about to buy it and found that it had a level of underbody rot that would render it unable to pass safety inspection. I Hope for my Clarity to have a similar lifespan.

Another thought: 10+ years from now, lithium-ion batteries will probably be old tech. If there are next-gen batteries available when the world's Clarity's batteries are dying, will those be compatible? It would be cool if a pack could be fashioned to fit the Clarity, and it would give it way over the ~45 mile range it currently has. I wonder if that would blow the guess-o-meter's mind!
My guess is that replacement 3rd party packs will be available in the future. I don’t know for sure about the Clarity but it seems that many PHEVs and EVs are using a version of the ubiquitous 18650 Lithium-ion battery. It shouldn’t be hard for refurbishers to re-pack the Clarity battery pack with new cells I would think.
 

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There is definitely hope for our Clarities after the battery wears down but the amount of batteries needing replacements will have to wait for another 3-6 years as the Honda EV battery warranty expires.

If you are in CA, Honda extends the warranty by 2 years.
My 2018 Clarity battery warranty is good until 2028 so I am very much relieved at how Honda stands behind their product.

Also, when and if time comes to replace the battery, @MBossK4891 & @ClarityDave may be correct in that battery pack replacements by 3rd party repair shops can do it for a fraction of a new dealer replacement.

Here's an article on the Nissan Leaf w/ 24kWh battery packs being replaced for $1000:
https://cleantechnica.com/2020/08/30/dozens-of-shops-are-now-replacing-nissan-leaf-batteries/
 

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It's been a long time since I was on the forum - forgot login info so just reregistered through Google. I have a 2018 Clarity with 35,742 miles. I also had to replace the battery pack 4 weeks ago (thank heaven under warranty) because of Honda's design flaw (my words - not theirs), The regulator for the battery pack is built into the pack, so when the regulator kept failing (throwing me into dead battery and system reset modes), they had to replace the whole battery pack. According to my dealer it is a $6000 replacement, and it took nearly a month just to get one out of California. It's also has. net weight of $850 pounds!

Took them a week (apparently watching a lot of training videos) but good as new and back to near 55 mile range (that's my springtime average).
 

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lithium-ion batteries will probably be old tech. If there are next-gen batteries available when the world's Clarity's batteries are dying, will those be compatible?
dc voltage is dc voltage, so it'll be compatible

but there are so few Claritys, my guess is it's not going to be worth the effort to design a whole new carrier and harness for whatever the new form factor next gen batteries will appear

and if there is somebody that does it, it'll be expensive

with new car designs that we already see now, like my ioniq 5, the Clarity will look positively archaic

notwithstanding the fact that it's currently in the top ten ugliest cars on the road even today

admit it... maybe top five?
 

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with new car designs that we already see now, like my ioniq 5, the Clarity will look positively archaic

notwithstanding the fact that it's currently in the top ten ugliest cars on the road even today

admit it... maybe top five?
When the Clarity first came out most of the car review sites were positive about most things about it, except of course for the styling. But none of them seemed to come down too hard on it, they understood that like the Prius there is a certain amount of form follows function going on. And that no one is buying one of these to impress anyone with the styling. But surprisingly it seems most owners have found that they get mostly positive comments, seemingly genuine not just people trying to be polite. As for looking archaic in the coming years, probably not much more than say the Accord, Civic, Camry, etc. But those are all known to be comfortable, reliable, fairly efficient cars which suits the very large market of car buyers who mostly value those things and who don't place as much of an importance on styling. People who put a higher value on styling, I agree they probably won't be getting a Clarity.
 

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One compliment from a stranger in three years

Multiple "bloated guppy"-ish comments from coworkers

but i expected and even encouraged them, because they're my friends

and because they're not really lying
Don't doubt that was your experience. Although the sample of your coworkers may or may not represent a cross section of the overall buying public nationwide, but I'm sure there are many people out there who agree with your friends. Although in spite of virtually no marketing by Honda there was quite a lot of interest in Clarity and that continues in the used car market, so apparently it doesn't look terrible to everyone. Prices are certainly overinflated but that's true for all cars.

Apparently the bloated look in the rear is because of the hydrogen fuel tank in the FCEV Clarity which was the original model.
 

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One compliment from a stranger in three years

Multiple "bloated guppy"-ish comments from coworkers

but i expected and even encouraged them, because they're my friends

and because they're not really lying
Personally, I don’t think the car will win any awards for styling but then again, there are a lot of designs out there that fall into that category. I bought the car mostly for its functionality and not its looks. It’s stylish enough that I’m not embarrassed to drive it and that’s all that matters. I did have a guy once who spotted it in a parking lot and waited until I came out to ask questions about it. He was very curious because he’d never seen a Honda quite like that before and he seemed to be impressed when I explained what it was.
 

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So my question is will our Clarity's or any plug in hybrid's batteries degrade quicker due to having to recharge them so often? I read that part of what lowers a battery's lifespan is how many charges it gets. Does this concern anyone else?
 

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Battery life is a concern to me.

That said we moved up from a '13 Ford C-MAX Energi with an air cooled battery that
experienced significant battery degradation when charged in hot weather. AND Ford in their infinite wisdom clearly stated in their warranty that decreased capacity is NOT covered.

Technologically liquid cooled is supposed to be superior, so that was a plus for us. We did purchase an extended warranty although to be honest not sure how it relates to the battery. 😬

My wife traded the C-MAX for the Clarity after 5 years of ownership, at the sign of some noise I was guessing from the transmission. I'm not sure I was worried thinking any further than that. We are close to that mileage already if I recall correctly....

My main concern would be whether replacement batteries are available, not a degradation concern, as we'll just burn more gas if that's all that is needed for the car to run properly.
 

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We bought a 2018 clarity new in 2018 and it has about 53k miles on it and the battery seems to have degraded. Our max range is in the low 40's. We were getting mid 50's in the beginning. we live in SC and we charge it nightly in a warm garage in the summer. I bought a 2018 leaf last year and it has 37k miles and the battery seems in mint condition with the max range not changing.
 

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The Clarity will face the same problems as any other low volume car - simply not enough of them on the road for a good aftermarket to develop. This will be for all parts, including the main traction battery.
 

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The Clarity will face the same problems as any other low volume car - simply not enough of them on the road for a good aftermarket to develop. This will be for all parts, including the main traction battery.
Of course it’s possible that instead of being a difficult to manufacture custom part, the traction battery may be an enclosure which can be reused with individual lithium cells that are more or less generic and can be easily replaced.
 

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Of course it’s possible that instead of being a difficult to manufacture custom part, the traction battery may be an enclosure which can be reused with individual lithium cells that are more or less generic and can be easily replaced.
We can certainly hope for this.
 

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Easy today to assemble a battery pack that would replace the current one and have more capacity. Several solutions exist such as:

The problem is reprogramming the Clarity to recognize and manage the new batteries - voltage, capacity, charging requirements, cooling requirements, temperature and voltage monitoring, cell balancing, etc. Battery replacement is not a hardware issue, but a software challenge. Without a software change on the Clarity side, the only viable replacement battery/cell is exactly what was original equipment.
 

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We bought a 2018 clarity new in 2018 and it has about 53k miles on it and the battery seems to have degraded. Our max range is in the low 40's. We were getting mid 50's in the beginning. we live in SC and we charge it nightly in a warm garage in the summer. I bought a 2018 leaf last year and it has 37k miles and the battery seems in mint condition with the max range not changing.
Are you judging range based on the Guess-O-Meter (GOM) indication at full State of Charge (SOC), or actual miles achieved from 100% SOC to empty, as measured on the odometer?

The range estimate on the GOM is just that...a guess. It's based on your previous driving habits. You may drive more aggressively than the previous owner, and the GOM is reflecting that. The more agressive your driving style, the fewer miles you'll get on a full charge.
 
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