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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just purchased a 2018 honda clarity i charged it for the first time but was unable to charge fully because i ran out of time. It charged to 77% but when i drove it it dropped to 38% in 4 miles i did use the climate control because it was cold put the car was still plugged up could there be something wrong??
 

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I think the key to your question is "it was cold". Define cold. EVs generally lose about 20% of their range in freezing temperatures, even without cabin temperature management. Using heat to warm the cabin uses even more energy. The Clarity uses resistive heat (think hair blow dryer), which consumes a lot of energy. In fact, the Clarity's cabin heater uses more energy per minute than you can pull from a 120V 15 amp circuit, so you'll see your EV range go down while plugged in running the heater.

The other thing that comes to mind is how did the previous owner drive the car (I'm assuming it's a used car). The car tracks your driving habits and adjusts to them. I suspect the car has been driven in sport mode a lot with spirited driving (for a 4,000 lb family sedan). As you drive the car it will learn your driving habits - this car, like all cars, is most efficient when driving like a little old lady, as long as she wasn't from Pasadena. Basically, take it easy on the throttle, keeping the power meter below the half way point and let off the throttle early as you approach stops and traffic slowdowns. It takes about 100 miles for the car to adjust to you.

Welcome to Clarity ownership and the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think the key to your question is "it was cold". Define cold. EVs generally lose about 20% of their range in freezing temperatures, even without cabin temperature management. Using heat to warm the cabin uses even more energy. The Clarity uses resistive heat (think hair blow dryer), which consumes a lot of energy. In fact, the Clarity's cabin heater uses more energy per minute than you can pull from a 120V 15 amp circuit, so you'll see your EV range go down while plugged in running the heater.

The other thing that comes to mind is how did the previous owner drive the car (I'm assuming it's a used car). The car tracks your driving habits and adjusts to them. I suspect the car has been driven in sport mode a lot with spirited driving (for a 4,000 lb family sedan). As you drive the car it will learn your driving habits - this car, like all cars, is most efficient when driving like a little old lady, as long as she wasn't from Pasadena. Basically, take it easy on the throttle, keeping the power meter below the half way point and let off the throttle early as you approach stops and traffic slowdowns. It takes about 100 miles for the car to adjust to you.

Welcome to Clarity ownership and the forum.
Thank you so much this was very helpful
 

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I think the key to your question is "it was cold". Define cold. EVs generally lose about 20% of their range in freezing temperatures, even without cabin temperature management. Using heat to warm the cabin uses even more energy. The Clarity uses resistive heat (think hair blow dryer), which consumes a lot of energy. In fact, the Clarity's cabin heater uses more energy per minute than you can pull from a 120V 15 amp circuit, so you'll see your EV range go down while plugged in running the heater.

The other thing that comes to mind is how did the previous owner drive the car (I'm assuming it's a used car). The car tracks your driving habits and adjusts to them. I suspect the car has been driven in sport mode a lot with spirited driving (for a 4,000 lb family sedan). As you drive the car it will learn your driving habits - this car, like all cars, is most efficient when driving like a little old lady, as long as she wasn't from Pasadena. Basically, take it easy on the throttle, keeping the power meter below the half way point and let off the throttle early as you approach stops and traffic slowdowns. It takes about 100 miles for the car to adjust to you.

Welcome to Clarity ownership and the forum.
Also, the car guesses whether you will be driving highway speeds which use more battery/mile or local (low battery/mile) based on previous driving habits.
 

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I think the key to your question is "it was cold". Define cold. EVs generally lose about 20% of their range in freezing temperatures, even without cabin temperature management. Using heat to warm the cabin uses even more energy. The Clarity uses resistive heat (think hair blow dryer), which consumes a lot of energy. In fact, the Clarity's cabin heater uses more energy per minute than you can pull from a 120V 15 amp circuit, so you'll see your EV range go down while plugged in running the heater.

The other thing that comes to mind is how did the previous owner drive the car (I'm assuming it's a used car). The car tracks your driving habits and adjusts to them. I suspect the car has been driven in sport mode a lot with spirited driving (for a 4,000 lb family sedan). As you drive the car it will learn your driving habits - this car, like all cars, is most efficient when driving like a little old lady, as long as she wasn't from Pasadena. Basically, take it easy on the throttle, keeping the power meter below the half way point and let off the throttle early as you approach stops and traffic slowdowns. It takes about 100 miles for the car to adjust to you.

Welcome to Clarity ownership and the forum.
There is nothing wrong with your Clarity.

Agree with @obermd - cold weather will decrease battery capacity as well as cause you turn on cabin heating which will seriously drain the EV battery.

Try this to improve your range:
Drive without cabin heating, ECO EV mode, gentle acceleration, lots of coasting, paddle shift down instead of braking and drive in city traffic to maximize regeneration.

Do this for a week.

Let us know what happens ?
 

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i did use the climate control because it was cold
Be sure to use the seat heater because that uses far less electricity than cabin heat. Most people find that when using the seat heater they can set the cabin temperature several degrees lower than they otherwise would which saves a lot of electricity. In milder weather I often find that I get along fine with just the seat heater and I turn off cabin heat completely.

Also you can prewarm the cabin before you leave and you don't even have to start the car. On the keyfob press the door lock button, then press and hold the fan button until the parking lights start blinking, this will start up the climate system. This is often referred to as preconditioning, and it will automatically use heat or AC as needed. After starting preconditioning if you want to check if it's working, be sure to open the passenger door, because opening the driver door turns off preconditioning.

Even better is that you can run preconditioning while the car is plugged in, that way it won't reduce your EV range. You can run preconditioning up to 30 minutes, after that it automatically shuts off. But normally 10-15 minutes of preconditioning is plenty.

You can also start preconditioning using the HondaLink app but that is less reliable, it's better to use the key fob.
 

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Be sure to use the seat heater because that uses far less electricity than cabin heat. Most people find that when using the seat heater they can set the cabin temperature several degrees lower than they otherwise would which saves a lot of electricity. In milder weather I often find that I get along fine with just the seat heater and I turn off cabin heat completely.
This ^^^. I run my Volt cabin at 62 in the winter and use the seat and steering wheel heater. The power difference between 62 and 65 or 68 is about 10% of my battery.
 

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So I've been driving my wife's Clarity while my Volt is in the shop. The Clarity looses about 40% of its EV range when the outside temps drop below freezing.
 

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Yo can get quite a bit more range if you just use heated seats instead of heating the cabin.
True. I keep the cabin at 62 and I use the heated seats. However, this is double the range impact of my Volt in the same conditions and is double the impact found by Bjorn when he was cold weather testing in Norway. Something's amiss in the Honda setup with regards to cold weather. It's little things like this that make me think Honda is looking very hard at the issues discovered in the Clarity (all versions) before jumping into the BEV world.
 

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True. I keep the cabin at 62 and I use the heated seats. However, this is double the range impact of my Volt in the same conditions and is double the impact found by Bjorn when he was cold weather testing in Norway. Something's amiss in the Honda setup with regards to cold weather. It's little things like this that make me think Honda is looking very hard at the issues discovered in the Clarity (all versions) before jumping into the BEV world.
Likely they will use a heat pump for a BEV like they did on Clarity Electric. They kind of cheaped out by only having a resistance heater on the Clarity PHEV. Or maybe they didn't have room in the PHEV for the extra plumbing needed for a heat pump.
 

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Get this, the Clarity Electric has a couple of gauges on the instrument panel that show how much energy is used for climate, and how much predicted range can be gained by shutting off climate.
Font Parallel Rectangle Technology Brand
 

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Get this, the Clarity Electric has a couple of gauges on the instrument panel that show how much energy is used for climate, and how much predicted range can be gained by shutting off climate.
View attachment 897
This would be nice! I am guessing that the addition of the ICE in the PHEV would make this computation far more complex, as it introduces additional climate control and energy variables.
 

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This would be nice! I am guessing that the addition of the ICE in the PHEV would make this computation far more complex, as it introduces additional climate control and energy variables.
My Volt has similar display information, so I don't think the ICEV makes a difference. If you're running the gas engine, it generates excess heat that is used to heat the cabin, so you're not using the traction battery for this purpose.
 

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Be sure to use the seat heater because that uses far less electricity than cabin heat. Most people find that when using the seat heater they can set the cabin temperature several degrees lower than they otherwise would which saves a lot of electricity. In milder weather I often find that I get along fine with just the seat heater and I turn off cabin heat completely.

Also you can prewarm the cabin before you leave and you don't even have to start the car. On the keyfob press the door lock button, then press and hold the fan button until the parking lights start blinking, this will start up the climate system. This is often referred to as preconditioning, and it will automatically use heat or AC as needed. After starting preconditioning if you want to check if it's working, be sure to open the passenger door, because opening the driver door turns off preconditioning.

Even better is that you can run preconditioning while the car is plugged in, that way it won't reduce your EV range. You can run preconditioning up to 30 minutes, after that it automatically shuts off. But normally 10-15 minutes of preconditioning is plenty.

You can also start preconditioning using the HondaLink app but that is less reliable, it's better to use the key fob.
I have a L2 charger on a circuit with reduced rates for off-peak charging and my Clarity is set to only charge between midnight and 5:00am.

I went out this morning with the fob to see if the car would override the midnight-5:00 charging time in order to pre-condition.

Press lock, hold fan. Parking lights flash; preconditioning works fine. (Punched fan again for "off.")

That's an 18c/kWh "penalty" rate on the L2 circuit, but I can live with that.
 
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Likely they will use a heat pump for a BEV like they did on Clarity Electric. They kind of cheaped out by only having a resistance heater on the Clarity PHEV. Or maybe they didn't have room in the PHEV for the extra plumbing needed for a heat pump.
GM did the same thing in the Bolt. Curious, since the EV-1 had a heat pump. The Bolt has a resistive heat element in a liquid coolant loop. We use the seat (and steering wheel!) heaters, instead of the HVAC in our Bolt, even though we're in So. CA. Doing so can greatly increase range in areas that see actual cold weather in winter.
 
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