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I am looking at swapping from a ‘12 Volt to an ‘18 Clarity Plug-in. On the volt there is a screen on the center info screen that shows how many miles you went electric on a trip and the number of kWhs used. Is there a similar screen on the Clarity? I would like to look at this information on the clarities i am looking at.
 

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Clarity PHEV has the "Guess O Meter" which shows the miles per charge remaining.

I guess you can calculate approximately how much kWh used knowing the capacity and useful charge available....
 

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It's a glaring omission really, not sure if Honda intentionally left it off of the display or they just thought no one cares. Either one of those reasons is hard to explain.

What some people do is at each fill up they multiply the number of gallons pumped by 42 mpg to get an estimate of miles driven on gas, then subtract that from the total miles for that tankful, and that gives you estimated EV miles driven. There are two trip meters and you can set one of them to reset to zero whenever you fill up, so that at least makes it easier to track the total miles per tankful.
 

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It's a glaring omission really, not sure if Honda intentionally left it off of the display or they just thought no one cares. Either one of those reasons is hard to explain.

What some people do is at each fill up they multiply the number of gallons pumped by 42 mpg to get an estimate of miles driven on gas, then subtract that from the total miles for that tankful, and that gives you estimated EV miles driven. There are two trip meters and you can set one of them to reset to zero whenever you fill up, so that at least makes it easier to track the total miles per tankful.
WAG, is all we have, no matter what ”method” used. It’s not even extrapolation, just a guess.
 

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WAG, is all we have, no matter what ”method” used. It’s not even extrapolation, just a guess.
Are there any other methods for estimating total EV miles driven? I only know of this one. And I wouldn't say it's just a guess. Some people have run HV for a couple of tankfulls to check their mpg, they usually say that the EPA estimated 42 mpg is not that far off. Obviously that all depends on driving habits/conditions, if someone's situation is less typical like mostly 80 mph freeway, or lots of hills, then they probably should verify their mpg, but for most people 42 mpg is probably a reasonable estimate. And mpg is the only part of the equation that is an estimate, the other two parts of the formula, gallons pumped and total miles driven on the tank are easily obtainable. And it's not just about tracking EV miles, estimating the number of gas miles driven can be useful when deciding when to do oil changes, etc. None of this needs to be all that precise and I think that this estimate can at least give someone a pretty good idea.

Not that I do any of this, it doesn't matter that much to me I just try and drive EV when I can, and when I can't, oh well. But having owned a Prius I understand the desire to track things, I did with my Prius and I probably would with my Clarity if they displayed total EV miles. As for oil changes I just change it once a year because even without doing calculations I know that I am no where near needing to do it more often.
 

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not sure if Honda intentionally left it off of the display
Answering my own question, I just thought of a reason why they might not want to display actual EV miles and HV miles driven. It would cause more people to ignore the maintenance minder for oil changes if they saw how few gas miles they are driving. That would be a big loss of $$$ to dealer service departments.
 

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Are there any other methods for estimating total EV miles driven? I only know of this one. And I wouldn't say it's just a guess. Some people have run HV for a couple of tankfulls to check their mpg, they usually say that the EPA estimated 42 mpg is not that far off. Obviously that all depends on driving habits/conditions, if someone's situation is less typical like mostly 80 mph freeway, or lots of hills, then they probably should verify their mpg, but for most people 42 mpg is probably a reasonable estimate. And mpg is the only part of the equation that is an estimate, the other two parts of the formula, gallons pumped and total miles driven on the tank are easily obtainable. And it's not just about tracking EV miles, estimating the number of gas miles driven can be useful when deciding when to do oil changes, etc. None of this needs to be all that precise and I think that this estimate can at least give someone a pretty good idea.

Not that I do any of this, it doesn't matter that much to me I just try and drive EV when I can, and when I can't, oh well. But having owned a Prius I understand the desire to track things, I did with my Prius and I probably would with my Clarity if they displayed total EV miles. As for oil changes I just change it once a year because even without doing calculations I know that I am no where near needing to do it more often.
Would you feel better calling it a theory? If it’s not a fact, it’s something else, no?
 

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Answering my own question, I just thought of a reason why they might not want to display actual EV miles and HV miles driven. It would cause more people to ignore the maintenance minder for oil changes if they saw how few gas miles they are driving. That would be a big loss of $$$ to dealer service departments.
I like this answer. My service sheet reads: Change oil & filter, rotate tires, front & rear brake inspection, battery test, lube door locks, latches and hinges, fill washer fluid, top fluids, set tire pressure, complete multi-point inspection. $69 labor, $27 parts, $10 environmental disposal, $2 tax. They did wash the car and repair where the plastic bumper came loose on the side. They also took twice the hour and a quarter I was told it would take. In the past, I would have changed oil/filter, rotated tires, etc, but it was 16° today and my garage is unheated, so I didn't mind. My question is which battery did they test, and what all comprises the multi-point inspection.
 

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Answering my own question, I just thought of a reason why they might not want to display actual EV miles and HV miles driven. It would cause more people to ignore the maintenance minder for oil changes if they saw how few gas miles they are driving. That would be a big loss of $$$ to dealer service departments.
My Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid shows EV and HV miles driven but it’s not entirely accurate. Let’s say you’ve charged you battery up completely and you take a long trip in EV mode. After some miles the battery is exhausted and the vehicle switches over to hybrid mode. At this point the EV miles should be set in stone at least until the next time you recharge. But it doesn’t work that way. Every time the engine shuts off in hybrid mode those miles are counted as EV miles, like when I’m coasting down the other side of a mountain I just climbed. But in reality those aren’t technically EV miles in my opinion. The only reason I could coast down the other side of the mountain is because the engine was running in HV mode coming up the mountain in the first place. Technically, in my opinion, the miles coasting down the other side should still be counted as HV miles. So if the vehicle doesn’t even know how to categorize the miles driven, how could it correctly calculate the actual mpg? Just an observation.
 

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My Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid shows EV and HV miles driven but it’s not entirely accurate. Let’s say you’ve charged you battery up completely and you take a long trip in EV mode. After some miles the battery is exhausted and the vehicle switches over to hybrid mode. At this point the EV miles should be set in stone at least until the next time you recharge. But it doesn’t work that way. Every time the engine shuts off in hybrid mode those miles are counted as EV miles, like when I’m coasting down the other side of a mountain I just climbed. But in reality those aren’t technically EV miles in my opinion. The only reason I could coast down the other side of the mountain is because the engine was running in HV mode coming up the mountain in the first place. Technically, in my opinion, the miles coasting down the other side should still be counted as HV miles. So if the vehicle doesn’t even know how to categorize the miles driven, how could it correctly calculate the actual mpg? Just an observation.
I agree it should only count EV miles when you are in EV mode. Think about a situation where someone is unable to charge and so they always drive in HV mode. From what you are describing about the Pacifica it sounds like even for those people it will show some EV miles driven, if it counts whenever the engine is off. You don't even need to be going downhill for that to happen, I sometimes see the EV light on my Clarity come on briefly while I am cruising at a steady speed on a flat road.

Then again even if they did it the way that we think it should work, what about when someone uses HV Charge? On the Clarity you can easily store up 25 miles or so of EV, of course using gasoline to do it. Then later you switch to EV mode. So it will record 25 miles of EV, but really those EV miles came from gasoline not the grid.

In theory with some fancy software algorithms it could keep track of kWh that came from the grid, kWh that came from regenerative braking, and kWh that came from the ICE generator, and keep those numbers in separate "buckets". Then somehow allocate those as the car is driven, either using a FIFO method (first in, in first out), or maybe a prioritized method (grid first, then regen, then gas generated). And of course it has to separate out miles driven while in gear mode (engine direct drive) all of which will get allocated to HV. And if you shut off the car with some charge left it has to continue to store the kWh values in each of the buckets, to be allocated on your next drive.

I don't see them going to this amount of trouble, I mean how many more cars will they sell by doing this? So unless or until they have something that sophisticated, probably the best way to come up with a realistic number that is meaningful is to simply calculate based on gas purchases, which gives a reasonable estimate of miles driven on gas. If someone is interested in EV miles then just subtract gas miles from total miles.
 
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