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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
An EVSE shouldn't get hot as it is just (essentially) a relay that sends current to the charger (in the car) when all safety parameters have been satisfied. Is the EVSE from a reputable vendor and UL/CSA/ETL listed? "Too hot" is relative, but implies that it would be uncomfortable to touch it? Excess heat is the sign of bad connections and/or undersized components.
Some EVSE cords do get a little hot if they are sized to be "just enough" to carry the load. This is usually done to save weight, cost, and make them easier to handle.
An EVSE shouldn't get hot as it is just (essentially) a relay that sends current to the charger (in the car) when all safety parameters have been satisfied. Is the EVSE from a reputable vendor and UL/CSA/ETL listed? "Too hot" is relative, but implies that it would be uncomfortable to touch it? Excess heat is the sign of bad connections and/or undersized components.
Some EVSE cords do get a little hot if they are sized to be "just enough" to carry the load. This is usually done to save weight, cost, and make them easier to handle.
Thank you so much for your comments Gary! I appreciate it very much.
I was able to buy an infra-red thermometer. And checked the temperarure of the 16A, 240V charger while charging. At the beginning, it read 96.9 F. After 1 hour of charge the temperature rose to 113 F. After 1½ the temperature rose to 117 F. and it remained at this temperature for another 55 minutes or so. At which time the charge was full. I'd like to mention that the temperature in point where the extension cord and the charging cable mert was at 104 F, while the piece that connects to the car only reached 99.5 F.
I must indicate that I'm also using a 30A, 25 ft extension cord from the wall outlet to the charging unit. I also have a 30A braker on this line. I'd appreciate if anybody out there has any idea if these temperatures are within normal parameters, or if these temperatures are an indication of something wrong and I should stop using this charger.
Thank you very much in advance for any feedback you can provide. I appreciate it very much.
 

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Thank you so much for your comments Gary! I appreciate it very much.
I was able to buy an infra-red thermometer. And checked the temperarure of the 16A, 240V charger while charging. At the beginning, it read 96.9 F. After 1 hour of charge the temperature rose to 113 F. After 1½ the temperature rose to 117 F. and it remained at this temperature for another 55 minutes or so. At which time the charge was full. I'd like to mention that the temperature in point where the extension cord and the charging cable mert was at 104 F, while the piece that connects to the car only reached 99.5 F.
I must indicate that I'm also using a 30A, 25 ft extension cord from the wall outlet to the charging unit. I also have a 30A braker on this line. I'd appreciate if anybody out there has any idea if these temperatures are within normal parameters, or if these temperatures are an indication of something wrong and I should stop using this charger.
Thank you very much in advance for any feedback you can provide. I appreciate it very much.
Seem to remember my Volt specifically warned against using any extension cords to charge, so that might be relevant here too.
 

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At the beginning, it read 96.9 F. After 1 hour of charge the temperature rose to 113 F. After 1½ the temperature rose to 117 F.
The EVSE box was 96.9 F before you started charging? How high above air temperature was that?

I am using the OEM 12 Amp level 1 EVSE. Starting temperature for everything was 82 degrees, except for the box (the part with the orange and green lights) which was 84 degrees, indicating that the EVSE draws a small amount of power when not in use, which is to be expected.

After an hour of charging the box was 96 degrees, all of the other cables and connectors were 84 degrees. After two hours temperatures remained the same as they were at one hour.

Your 16 amp EVSE would presumably get warmer than a 12 amp unit, although I'm not sure if 117 is typical or not.
 

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Seem to remember my Volt specifically warned against using any extension cords to charge, so that might be relevant here too.
Probably using a simple prohibition because a lot of people have cheap #16AWG extension cords lying around that could be a fire hazard. It's easier to just disallow them all than specify which ones could be used. Using an extension cord also eliminates the function of a thermal switch (if equipped) at the outlet. Old outlets are a likely location for poor electrical connections that can lead to heating...at the outlet. That function would move to the extension cord receptacle, instead. None of this should have any bearing on the EVSE case itself heating up, though.

I have a 90' #12AWG 600V high-quality commercial-grade extension cord that I've used for years, on up to 16A EVSEs at 240V, with no problem at all. Not a recommendation, but a statement of fact. YMMV.
 

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my outlet and plug get up to 150 deg F
That sounds a bit high to me. I'd replace the duplex outlet with a high-quality commercial one, pigtail it (unless it's the last outlet downstream), and use the screw-down terminals on the outlet, with the pigtails. It's a good idea to check any outlets upstream on the same circuit as well. In an ideal world, they should be pigtailed and screwed down too.

My recommendation is to never use the push-in terminals on the back of a duplex outlet. The contact area with the pushed-in wire is tiny, and is prone to developing into a high-resistance and heat creating connection, especially with a long-lasting and relatively high current that an EVSE can present.
 
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