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You can get as fast a Level 2 charger as your breaker box has room for, the car will only accept it's limit. Then you may not need/want to upgrade it later say you change to another vehicle with faster charger.

I got a 40A Leviton unit also from Amazon, back in 2013 when we bought our first plug-in, a '13 Ford C-MAX Energi. That car had an even slower charger it took about 2 hours 20 mins for 22 mi of charge. For the Clarity PHEV it's also 2 hr 20 mins at it's peak rate, which as you may know is roughly 50 mi of charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hi all, just got a ‘19 clarity and we love it. Can anybody recommend a good Level II charger, and what’s the max amp I should be charging?

thx!
You can get as fast a Level 2 charger as your breaker box has room for, the car will only accept it's limit. Then you may not need/want to upgrade it later say you change to another vehicle with faster charger.

I got a 40A Leviton unit also from Amazon, back in 2013 when we bought our first plug-in, a '13 Ford C-MAX Energi. That car had an even slower charger it took about 2 hours 20 mins for 22 mi of charge. For the Clarity PHEV it's also 2 hr 20 mins at it's peak rate, which as you may know is roughly 50 mi of charge.
Thank you for the info!
 

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2021 PHEV Touring HB, CA
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The OEM EVSE will work at 240V with an adapter, but it won't say so on the EVSE itself. The EVSE internals were designed to work both in the USA, and in countries that have 240V as the common outlet voltage. The only difference is the plug on the end, and the regulatory stickers. I've made modifications to mine, by cutting off the 5-15P, and replacing it with a plug to match all of my adapters and extensions. Just understand that if you make mods or use an adapter, you're effectively circumventing the OEM EVSE's stock 5-15P thermal safety function, intended to shut the EVSE down in the case of a bad connection causing heat at the wall receptacle. Do so at your own risk, and as always, YMMV.

Doing this effectively doubles the charge rate to 240V at 12A, or 2.88kW, and the OEM EVSE can fill the Clarity PHEV completely, in about six hours.
 

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Hi all, just got a ‘19 clarity and we love it. Can anybody recommend a good Level II charger, and what’s the max amp I should be charging?

thx!
I went ahead and purchased the Grizzl e brand charger with a plug as mine is installed outdoors and I have the flexibility to take it with me. The same plug is used at many places that provide RV hookups. The car will only draw what it needs, but you could limit the Grizzl e if you desire. The stock normal EVSE that was included would work for me 85% of the time as I usually have 10 hours at home, but I wanted the flexibility to "fast" charge for the 15% of the time when I would need that. Welcome to the Clarity group!
 

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Leviton 32A level 2 charger. 40 amp circuit with 8 gage wiring. 2:20 to charge from empty. If you think you're going to go to something similar to a Tesla (70 amp) in the future, spend the money now and have a 70 amp breaker with 4 gage wire installed. I had to change out my wiring from 10 to 8 gage when I switched from a 16A to 32 A EVSE.
 

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Leviton 32A level 2 charger. 40 amp circuit with 8 gage wiring. 2:20 to charge from empty. If you think you're going to go to something similar to a Tesla (70 amp) in the future, spend the money now and have a 70 amp breaker with 4 gage wire installed. I had to change out my wiring from 10 to 8 gage when I switched from a 16A to 32 A EVSE.
If the intent is to allow for actual 70A charging, the entire circuit would need to be up-sized to account for the NEC 80% rule. 80% of 90A is 72A, so a 100A circuit probably makes the most sense. It ain't gonna be cheap!
 

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Not cheap, but inevitable. As electric cars become the norm and range is extended, faster charging times will be desired. Paying for it once is better than paying to redo it, as I did moving from a Prius Prime to the Clarity
 

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Not cheap, but inevitable. As electric cars become the norm and range is extended, faster charging times will be desired. Paying for it once is better than paying to redo it, as I did moving from a Prius Prime to the Clarity
I put two 50A 240V circuits in my garage, during a remodel. One on a side wall, and one near the big door, serving the driveway. I don't see myself with a future need for more than a 9.6kW (40A) charging rate that gives almost 40 miles of range per hour. Right now, each circuit has a 30A EVSE on it, and they do get used simultaneously, on occasion.
 

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Not cheap, but inevitable. As electric cars become the norm and range is extended, faster charging times will be desired. Paying for it once is better than paying to redo it, as I did moving from a Prius Prime to the Clarity
Almost anyone with an EV needs level 2 charging at home. But most people don't need anything like 70 amp at home where you are just topping up overnight. Super high speed charging is needed on the road while travelling.

Sure there could be a hypothetical scenario where someone needs to charge 200 miles at home in a very short period of time, like arriving home from work with the 200 miles nearly depleted and then heading out just a couple of hours later on a long range trip. But for most people that will rarely if ever happen, and if it does well then they have to charge on the road, which they will likely have to do anyway depending on the trip. Of course to cover all bases you can get the highest capacity that your building code allows, and be willing to pay whatever the cost, considering that some options might require a new panel whereas others might not.

I agree if doing a new installation it's worth at least pricing each option and looking for the sweet spot where you can get some additional future proofing for not a whole lot more money. For each installation that sweet spot is going to be different.

Another consideration is how long you expect to be in your home, which like anything is only an estimate. You may or my not recoup the cost of the EV outlet in the sales price, as not every homebuyer is future thinking.
 

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Hi all, just got a ‘19 clarity and we love it. Can anybody recommend a good Level II charger, and what’s the max amp I should be charging?

thx!
Congratulations :)
The Clarity PHEV will charge at ~32 amps using a Level 2 charging cable pulled into a 220-240V outlet. Some "L2" chargers will only charge at up to 16 amps, which is faster than L1 but slower than L2 at 32 amps. I use a JuiceBox 40 amp charger. Be sure any charger you buy is UL registered; some Amazon L2 chargers are NOT UL listed and have had over-heating and shorting problems, presenting a fire risk. L2 charging at 32 amps will require a 220-240 volt outlet. If you install such a circuit/outlet new in your garage, you may want to have the electrician wire this for 40 amps on a 50 amp breaker. The charger will only draw 32 amps for Clarity, but the 40 amp circuit will let you more rapidly charge a future car that can draw more current (such as a Tesla).
 

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Congratulations :)
The Clarity PHEV will charge at ~32 amps using a Level 2 charging cable pulled into a 220-240V outlet. Some "L2" chargers will only charge at up to 16 amps, which is faster than L1 but slower than L2 at 32 amps. I use a JuiceBox 40 amp charger. Be sure any charger you buy is UL registered; some Amazon L2 chargers are NOT UL listed and have had over-heating and shorting problems, presenting a fire risk. L2 charging at 32 amps will require a 220-240 volt outlet. If you install such a circuit/outlet new in your garage, you may want to have the electrician wire this for 40 amps on a 50 amp breaker. The charger will only draw 32 amps for Clarity, but the 40 amp circuit will let you more rapidly charge a future car that can draw more current (such as a Tesla).
If you use a 50A breaker, the entire circuit (breaker, wire and receptacle) needs to be rated for 50A.
 
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